Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst., Vidensk. Meddel. Naturhist. Foren. Kjøbenhavn 1858: 14 (1859)

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Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Boliviapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Brazil Northpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Colombiapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Costa Ricapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Ecuadorpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
El Salvadorpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Guatemalapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Honduraspresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Mexico Gulfpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Mexico Southeastpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Mexico Southwestpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Nicaraguapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Panamápresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Perupresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Venezuelapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Colombia and Venezuela to Bolivia and Brazil, at up to 2400 m elevation. In Ecuador it is common in the E lowlands and on the E and W Andean slopes, in primary as well as in secondary forest, often on steep slopes. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Discussion

  • The species is variable, especially in leaf size, number and size of pinnae, and size and ramification of the inflorescence. It is defined by having male flowers with petals fused at their apex, but variation in vegetative characters within the species is not fully understood. Simple-leaved forms are sometimes found occurring together with the common, pinnate-leaved form, e.g., around Plan de Milagro in the Morona-Santiago province. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Description

  • Understorey palm. Stem solitary, to 4 m tall and 2.5 cm in diameter, green. Leaf sheath closed for at least 4/5 of its length; blade pinnately divided or rarely entire, 25-75 cm long and 15-30 cm wide; pinnae 7-15 on each side, usually conspicuously sigmoid. Inflorescences infrafoliar, one per node, to 80 cm long, once branched; male inflorescences with 3-25 pendulous branches; female inflorescences with 2-15, horizontal to erect branches, orange in fruit. Male flowers with petals united at apex. Fruits black, ca. 9 x 11 mm. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Use Record

  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst. Español: Casha ponilla, Ponilla, Chontilla. Urarina: Eichú Usos: Construcción — Se utilizan las hojas en los techos de las viviendas y el tallo para viviendas también. Herramientas y utensilios — En algunos casos se utiliza la raíz como escoba y el tallo para herramientas; también se hacen ratoneras de los tallos; los frutos sirven como cebo para pescar y como cuentas en artesanías. Alimenticio — Los frutos maduros son comestibles. Para venta — Se venden los frutos para comer y las semillas para collares. Comunidad: 3, 5, 7–16, 19–22, 24–30. Voucher: H. Balslev 6664. (Balslev, H., C. Grandez, et al., Useful palms (Arecaceae) near Iquitos, Peruvian Amazon. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
    Animal FoodFish baitFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticRootNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    CulturalPersonal adornmentSeedsNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    CulturalPersonal adornmentFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Chamaedorea pinnatifrons plants are removed from the forest by campesinos and sold in street-side markets in some cities. (Bernal, R., Demography of the Vegetable Ivory Palm Phytelephas seemannii in Colombia, and the Impact of Seed Harvesting. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Chuzo. Tallo. (Cerón, C.E., A. Payaguaje, D. Payaguaje et al., Etnobotánica Secoya. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Construcción. Hoja. Empleada de modo ocasional en el techado de viviendas. Medicinal. Palmito. Es cortado y aplicado directamente para aliviar el dolor de las picaduras de hormigas. Medicinal. Raíz. Se extrae la parte externa y se aplica directamente para aliviar el dolor de las picaduras de hormigas. Otros usos. Tallo. Elaboración de bastones. (Armesilla, P.J., Usos de las palmeras (Arecaceae),en la Reserva de la Biosfera-Tierra Comunitaria de Orígen Pilón Lajas, (Bolivia). 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Medicinal and VeterinaryPoisoningsRootIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryPoisoningsPalm heartIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Los frutos maduros son comida favorita de las aves frugívoras, las mismas que son cazadas por los indígenas cofanes. (Cerón, C.E., Etnobiología de los Cofanes de Dureno, provincia de Sucumbíos, Ecuador. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousCofánEcuador
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Ornamental. Todo. (Cerón, C.E., and C.I. Reyes, Parches de bosque y etnobotánica Shuar en Palora, Morona Santiago-Ecuador.. 2007)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: Otros usos. Hoja. Envolver cosas, tomar agua en los arroyos. (Macía, M.J., Multiplicity in palm uses by the Huaorani of Amazonian Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsWrappersEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: The basal part of the stem with its numerous adventitious roots has been used by the local population for whipping food; thus the local name, wich means " little mill." (Svenning, J.C., and H. Balslev, The palm flora of the Maquipucuna montane forest reserve, Ecuador. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemMestizoN/AEcuador
  • Chamaedorea pinnatifrons (Jacq.) Oerst.: The stem with stilt roots is used as a whisk. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticRootNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticRootNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
  • Chamaedorea lanceolata (Ruiz & Pav.) Kunth: The petioles are chewed by the Mayna Jivaros to blacken teeth, starting at an age of five or six years. (Schultes, R.E., and R.F. Raffauf, The healing forest- Medicinal and toxic plants of the Northwest Amazonia. 1990 (as Chamaedorea lanceolata (Ruiz & Pav.) Kunth))

Bibliography

A. Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador
B. World Checklist of Arecaceae