Euterpe oleracea Mart., Hist. Nat. Palm. 2: 29 (1824)

Primary tabs

Error message

  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 421 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value-suffix' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 421 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 421 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value-suffix' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 421 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: usort(): Array was modified by the user comparison function in compose_feature_block_wrap_elements() (line 1358 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
http://media.e-taxonomy.eu/palmae/photos/palm_tc_83095_2.jpg

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Brazil Northpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Brazil Northeastpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Colombiapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Ecuadorpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
French Guianapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Guyanapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Surinamepresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Trinidad-Tobagopresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Venezuelapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Panama (San Blas), Pacific coast of northern Ecuador (Esmeraldas, Pichincha) and Colombia (Cauca, Chocó, Córdoba, Nariño, Valle; and some areas of the Río Sinú and middle Magdalena valley in Antioquia, Córdoba, and Santander), Trinidad , Venezuela (Bolívar, Delta Amacuro, Sucre), the Guianas, and Brazil (Amapá, Maranho, Paná, Tocantins). It grows in large stands of high density in low-lying, tidal areas near the sea and in wet places near rivers, seldom occurring inland and then in wet places near streams or rivers. In the eastern Amazon basin it replaces Euterpe precatoria in these habitats. However, in the Pacific coastal region of Colombia and Ecuador, the two species are sympatric. Nevertheless, E. oleracea grows in inundated places, whereas E. precatoria grows on noninundated soils. Euterpe oleracea can be an aggressive colonizer of disturbed, swampy areas. Despite this, the habitat of the species is threatened by rice cultivation and shrimp farming in coastal Colombia. Oldeman (1969) has discussed the ecology of E. oleracea in swamps in French Guiana; Urdaneta (1981) has discussed the same in Venezuela. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Coastal regions in Brazil, Guyanas, Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador, in tidal fresh water swamps and in regularly inundated areas along rivers and streams. In Ecuador it is abundant in the river delta region in the NW (San Lorenzo, Borb�n). (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Discussion

Common Name

  • Brazil: acaí, acaí branco, acaizeiro, assaizeiro (in Brazil, the tree is acaizeiro, and the fruit is acaí), ka-be-re (Apinajé), ju?ara, jussara; Colombia: chapil , maquenque, murrapo, naidí, palmicha; Ecuador: bambil, palmiche; French Guiana: pinot; Suriname: baboenpina, kiskis pina, manaka, pina, prasara, wapoe, wapu, wasei; Trinidad: manac. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Uses

  • This species is important throughout its range because it produces both edible fruit and palm heart. In the Brazilian city of Belém, the fruits are an important part of the diet of a large proportion of the inhabitants (Wallace, 1853; Calzavara. 1972; Strudwick & Sobel, 1988). The fleshy mesocarp is mixed with water and made into a drink, and also recently into ice cream. Since the demise of Euterpe edulis as a source of palm heart, E. oleracea is currently the most important species. The canning and sale of palm heart was worth $120 million in 1988 (Strudwick & Sobel, 1988). On the Pacific coast of Colombia and Ecuador, too, there are canning factories for palm heart (Bernal, 1992). Because of its multiple stems, palm heart and fruits can be harvested without destroying the tree. This advantage, coupled with the fact that the palms grow in very high-density stands in the Amazon estuary, has recently attracted the attention of researchers interested in sustainable forest products. Anderson (1988) has discussed the use and management of forests dominated by E. oleracea near Belém. Throughout its range the palm is used for a host of minor items (see Borgtoft Pedersen & Balslev, 1990, for Ecuador). The stems are used for a variety of construction purposes. The young leaves are mashed and the sappy remains applied to stop bleeding or taken to stop hemorrhaging (J. Strudwick et al. 4681). Fruits and discarded seeds are fed to domestic animals. It is also commonly planted as an ornamental throughout the Amazon region in towns and near dwellings. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Description

  • Canopy palm. Stems clustered, to 20 m tall 10-20 cm in diameter. Leaves to 4 m long; crownshaft bluish green; petiole green, glabrous; pinnae to 100 on each side, regularly inserted, narrow, strongly pendulous, the central ones 60-110 cm long and 3-5 cm wide. Inflorescence erect, with axis 40-100 cm long; branches to 150, usually inserted on all sides of the rachis, to 70 cm long, 3-4 mm in diameter, densely covered with short, whitish brown hairs. Fruits black, globose, 1-2 cm in diameter. Endosperm ruminate. Seedling leaves deeply bifid. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A
  • Stems cespitose with up to 25 stems per clump, or occasionally appearing solitary and then with shoots at the base, erect or leaning, 3-20 m tall, 7-18 cm diam., usually gray with lichens, with a cone of red roots at base, these to 1 cm diam., and with pneumatophores.
    Leaves 8-14, arching; sheath 0.6-1.5 m long including a short ligule, dark brown, purple, green, dull red-green or yellow-green, with few, flat, scaltered, brownish scales especially on ligule; petiole 17-50 cm long, with few, flattened or raised scales or occasionally whitish, scurfy scales adaxially and on upper part of abaxial surface, mostly glabrous abaxially; rachis 1.5-3.7 m long, with similar scales like those of petiole; pinnae 40-80 per side, pendulous or less often horizontal (especially on younger plants), opposite to subopposite, long acuminate, with punctations abaxially, with prominent midvein and 2-3 lateral veins either side, the midvein with few ramenta abaxially; basal pinna 40-74 x 0.5- 1.5 cm; middle pinnae 0,6-1.1 m x 2-4.5 cm; apical pinna 24-50 x 0.6-1.8 cm.
    Inflorescences infrafoliar at anthesis, almost horizontal; peduncle 5-15 cm long, 2.7-4 cm diam.; prophyll 43-66 cm long, 11-14 cm diam.; peduncular bract 66-95 cm long, without an umbo; rachis 35-68 cm long, densely covered with whitish brown, branched hairs; rachillae (58-)80-162, 21-75 cm long, 3-4 mm diam. at anthesis, thickening in fruit, absent from adaxial, proximal part of rachis, densely covered with very short, appressed, whitish brown hairs; flowers in triads proximally, paired or solitary staminate distally; triad bracteole rounded; first flower bracteole apiculate, second and third flower bracteoles unequal, rounded, the largest 1-1.5 mm long; staminate flowers 4-5 mm long; sepals triangular to ovate, 2-3.5 mm long, unequal, ciliate; petals ovate, 3-4 mm long, purple to purplered; stamens arranged on a short receptacle; filaments 1.5-4 mm long; anthers 2-2.5 mm long; pistillode 2-3 mm long, deeply trifid at apex; pistillate flowers 3 mm long; sepals broadly tririangular, 2 mm long, ciliate; petals broadly triangular, 2-3 mm 1ong.
    Fruits globose or depressed globose, 1-2 cm diam., the stigmatic remains lateral; epicarp purple-black, black, or green, minutely tuberculate; seeds globose; endosperm deeply ruminate; eophyll bifid. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Materials Examined

  • PANAMA. SAN BLAS: Armila, W of Puerto Olbadia, 0 m, 7 Mar 1995, de Nevers 10700 (NY).
    COLOMBIA. ANTIOQUIA: Mpio. Mutatá, rd. from Pavaranograndc. 100-150 m, 13 Dec 1982, R. Bernal & Galeano 480 (COL); Mpio. Urrao, Vegáez, 100-200 m, 16 Jul 1983, R. Bernal & Galeano 670 (COL); Mpio. Caucasia, Palomas, Río Nechí, 60 m, 27 Dec 1983, R. Bernal 777 (COL).
    CAUCA; Gugai, 5 m, 16 Nov 1977, Idrobo 8727, 8728, 8729, 8730 (COL); 13 Nov 1983, Idrobo 11534 (COL).
    Chocó: Río Neguá, tributary of Río Atrato below Quibdó, 3 Apr 1958, Cuatrecasas & Llano 24200 (COL, US); Río Atrato, 2-5 hr. below Río Sucio above Loma Teguerre, 16 May 1967, Duke 10997 (BH, NY); ca. 10 km upstream from estuary of Río Baudó nr. Quebrada Paulita, 11 Feb -29 Mar 1967, Fuchs & Zanella 22053 (COL, K, NY, US); Quibdó-Tulunendo rd., ca. 8 km N of Quibdó, 70 m, 17 Jan 1979, Gentry & Rentería 24255 (MO); Guayabal, just N of Quibdó, 05°40'N, 76°40'W, 6 Feb 1983, Juncosa et al. 696 (NY); km 5 on rd. from Quibdó to Yuto, bank of Río Kaví, 05°30'N, 76°47'W, 26 iul 1984, S. King et al. 550 (K, NY); 2 km 5 of Yuto, 100 m, 10 Jul 1986, R. Bernal et al. 1104 (COL, FTG, NY).
    CORDOBA: Mpio. Tierralta, rd. from Tierralta to Frasquillo, 200 m, 28 Jul 1986, R. Bernal et al. 1202 (COL, NY).
    NARIÑO: Mpio. Tumaco, Tangarial, km 45 on Tumaco-Pasto rd., 20 Jul 1984, Balick et al. 1660 (NY); Mpio. Tumaco, Tangarial, ca. 80 m. 4 Oct 1895, R. Bernal & Galeallo 891 (COL, NY).
    SANTANDER: Between San Juan and Carare, 10 Jun 1975. Enciso s.n. (COL); Mpio Barrancabermeja, between Barranca and Río Sogamoso, 170 m, 30 Aug 1986, Schmidt-Mumm 441 (COL).
    VALLE: Río Yurumanguí, Veneral, 5- 50 m, 28 Jan- 10 Feb 1944, Cuatrecasas 15903 (COL); rd. from Buenaventura to Cali, 10 Jun 1944, Killip & Cuatrecasas 39006 (F)
    VENEZUELA, BOLIVAR: Rd. S of EI Dorado between km 42 and km 65, 26 Jul 1960, Steyermark 86703 (BH, NY).
    DELTA AMACURO: Without locality, 1965, Aristeguieta s.n. (BH); Río Manimo, 3 Mar 1911, Bond et al. 214 (GH, NY); Caño Pedernales, 18 Jul 1917, Curran & Haman 1332 (GH); Dept. Tucupita. 5-14 km ESE of Los Castillos de Guayana, 08°28'N, 62°12'W, 50-200 m, 28 Mar-2 Apr 1979, Davidse & González 16286 (MO); Río Amacuro. Vcnezuela-Guyana border, Sierra Imataca, 65- 80 m, 9 Nov 1960, Steyermark 87474 (BH, NY, US); Dept. Tucupita, Caño Capurito, 09°35'N, 61°55'W. 9 Oct 1977, Steyermark et al. 114430 (MO); Dept. Antonio Díaz, 09°10'N, 61°06'W, 15 Oct 1977, Steyermark et al. 114682 (MO).
    SUCRE: Dist. Benítez, Los Pozotes, 10°30'N, 63°07'W, 18 Feb 1980, Steyermark et al. 121263 (MO).
    TRINIDAD. Near lrois, St. Patrick, 12 Mar 1946, Bailey 185 (BH); Aripo Savanna, 5 Mar 1920, Britton et al. 278 (GH, NY, TRIN); 16 Aug 1991, Henderson & Coelho 1622 (NY, US); Cumato, 19 Aug 1963, Wessels Boer 1643 (NY); Cumato rd., 19 Aug 1963, Wessels Boer 1650 (NY); nr. Los Bojos, St. Patrick, 19 Oct 1963, Wessels Boer 1653 (NY).
    GUYANA, Georgetown, 1922, Dahlgren 610647 (MO); Cuyuni- Mazaruni region, Aurora, 06°47'N, 59°45'W, 60 m, 15 Oct 1989, Gillespie 2376 (NY); Kanuku Mts., 03°08'N, 59°23'W, 280-400 m, 24 Feb 1985, Jansen-Jacobs et al. 442 (NY, US); Kanuku Mts., Maipaima, camp 3 on Tsikoma Creek, 03°22'N, 59°30'W, 165 m, 19 Nov 1987, Jansen-Jacobs 1058 (NY); E. Bernice-Corentyne region, Torani Canal ca. 8 km W of Canje River, 05°48'N, 57°31'W, 18 Apr 1987, Pipoly et al. 11651 (NY, US)
    SURINAME. Near Pilëwimë (Apetina) on Tapanahoni River, 100 m, S Jul 1977, Moore et al. 10320 (BH); Coronie District, km 96 on rd. between Coppename River and Coranie Coconut Station, 13 Jul 1977, Moore et al. 10348 (BH); Mijnzorgweg, 19 Nov 1962, Wessels Boer 284 (NY, U); Arrawarra, 11 Dec 1962, Wessels Boer 346 (NY, U); Affobaka, km 66, 17 Dec 1962, Wessels Boer 350 (NY, U); Affobaka, km 66, 17 Dec 1962, Wessels Boer 353 (NY).
    FRENCH GUIANA. River Comté nr. rd. N2, 28 OCI 1981, Billiet & B. Jadin 1202 (NY).
    ECUADOR. ESMERALDAS: Río Cayapas, ½ hr. upstream from Borbón, 01° 06'N, 78°59'W, 5 m, 22 May 1986, Balslev et al. 62111 (AAU, COL, NY, QCA); Tola rd., 01°04'N, 79°05'W, 0 m, 16 Jul 1985, Barfod & Skov 60065 (AAU, NY), QCA); La Tola-Esmeralda, rd., km 20, 01°10'N, 79° 06'W, 10 m, 6 Feb 1987, Barfod et al. 60185 (AAU); Limones- Borbón at Lancha de Oro, 01°10'N, 78°58'W, 0 m, 30Aug 1980, Holm-Nielsen et al. 25229 (AAU); Santiago Estuary at Lagartera nr. La Tolita, 4 Aug 1966, Játiva & Epling 1182 (AAU, NY).
    PICHINCHA: Km 6 on rd. La Independencia-Puerto Quito, 150 m, 30 Jul 1984, Dodson et al. 14677 (NY).
    BRAZIL. AMAPA: Rio Oiapoque, 2.S km N of Cachoeira Tres Saltos, 02°13'N, 52°52'W, 11 Sep 1960, Irwin et al. 48172 (BH, NY).
    MARANHAO: Mpio. Bom jardim, along Rio Pindaré nr. jct. of Rio Carú and Rio Pindaré. 03°40'S, 46°05'W, 29 Aug 1983, Balick et al. 1476 (MG, NY); Island of São Luiz, Feb-Mar 1939, Froes 11757 (A, NY).
    PARA: Mpio. Marabá., Serra Norte (Carajas), nr. Cujuca (rd. between N-1 and tocaiuna), 24 Apr 1985, Anderson & Rosa 2210 (MG); 23 km S of Altamira, BR 230, EMBRAPA Research Station, 30 Oct 1977, Bolick et al. 904 (BH, MG, NY); Ilha de Marajó, Rio Anajás, 1 Nov 1987, Beck et al. 260 (NY); Belém, Museu Goeldi, 22 Dec 1962, Cavalcante 997 (MG); Mpio. Viseu, Braganca-Vi seu rd., km 15 after Rio Piná, 15 Feb 1968, Cavalcante 1940 (MG); Belém, 9 Apr 1918, Curran 2 (BH, GH, NY); Belém, 6 Nov 1984, Pinto 1 (MG); 20 Mar 1967, Moore 9547 (BH); Monte Alegre, Jul 1992. Henderson 1731 (NY); Mpio. Almeirim, Mt. Dourado, Caracurú, 18 Apr 1986, Pires et al. 887 (NY); Mpio. Marabá, Igarapé Azul, Serra Norte. 06°00'S, 50°42'W, 22 Jul 1986, Scariot 7 (NY); 1 hr. upstream from São Sebastião de Boa Vista, Marajó Island, 20 Oct 1984, Strudwick 4681 (NY); Anajás, opp. lown of Anajás on Rio Anajás, Marajó Island, 31 Oct 1984, Strudwick et al. 5011 (NY); nr. Icoaraci, Belém, 20 m, 23 Jul 1987, Tsugaru & Sano B-394 (NY).
    TOCANTINS: Mpio. Tocantinópolis, ca. 20 km W of Tocantinópolis, 06°30'S, 47°30'W, 12 Sep 1983, Balick et al. 1621 (NY). (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Use Record

  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Como planta ornamental. Las hojas tiernas son comestibles. (Vásquez, M., and J. B. Vásquez, La extraccíon de productos forestales diferentes de la madera en el ambito de Iquitos-Perú. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodBeveragesPalm heartNot identifiedN/APeru
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantNot identifiedN/APeru
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodBeveragesPalm heartNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Con los frutos de las especies de Euterpe (naidí) y Oenocarpus (milpesos) se preparan bebidas nutritivas y deliciosas. (…). Una bebida similar a la del milpesos se extrae de los frutos del naidí, amasándolos en agua. Aunque, al igual que con el milpesos, la explotación se hace principalmente a nivel doméstico, los frutos del naidí se venden en el mercado de algunas poblaciones, como en Buenaventura. (…). Desafortunadamente, la explotación no siempre se hace de modo racional, ni beneficia a las comunidades locales. El ejemplo dramático de esto es la explotación del palmito. Las poblaciones de naidí, que cubren miles de hectáreas al sur de la costa colombiana del Pacífico, han sido dadas en concesión a las empresas enlatadoras de palmito, que explotan las palmas silvestres mediante el trabajo de los dueños ancestrales del bosque, sin que a estos les quede una ganancia que les ayude a mejorar sus condiciones de vida. Así el nativo, por obtener el mayor beneficio posible, hace una explotación destructiva de un recurso que podría ser manejado de modo racional, y de esta manera los naidizales son arrasados. (Bernal, R., and G. Galeano, Las palmas del andén Pacífico.. 1993)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: De esta palma se extrae el "palmito" que es una importante fuente de alimento. De los frutos se prepara el jugo de "asaí". (...). Los botones florales se utilizan en la elaboración de encurtidos. (Gutiérrez-Vásquez, C.A. and R. Peralta, Palmas comunes de Pando, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFood additivesFlowerNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFood additivesFlowerNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Descensos azúcar en la sangre. "Huasaí" (raíz).(…). 250g de raíces cocidas en 2 litros de agua.(…). Mal de hígado. "Huasai" (raíz). (…). Preparado para curar el SIDA. "Huasai", raíz y (…). (…). Tratamiento del cáncer. 6 raíces de "Huasai" y 3 gotas de "Sangre de grado", cocidos en un litro de agua. (…). 1/4 kg de raíces cocidos en 4 litros de agua.(…). (Silva, H., and J. García, La Medicina Tradicional en Loreto. 1997)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Medicinal and VeterinaryInfections and infestationsRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryEndocrine systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryOtherRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryEndocrine systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryInfections and infestationsRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryOtherRootMestizoN/APeru
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: El cogollo de la copa, (…), forma un palmito de óptima calidad, muy requerido por la industria, exportándose (…). (…). Los residuos que quedan después de la extracción del palmito se utilizan en la alimentación de bovinos y porcinos y fermentado contituye un buen abono orgánico para hortalizas y frutales. (…). El tronco seco se emplea en construcciones rústicas y para leña. Las hojas verdes sirven para raciones del ganado y secas para coberturas de techos y paredes en construcción de uso transitoria. Las hojas trituradas, proveen de materia prima para la fabricación de papel. (…). El carozo (endocarpio y almendra), después de us descomposición se emplea como materia orgánica para cultivos hortícolas y ornamentales. La palmera entera es usada en las fiestas regionales de carnavales y San Juan, para lo cual la adornan con serpentina, regalos, etc., constituyendo la tradicional Humisha. (Barriga, R., Plantas útiles de la Amazonia Peruana: características, usos y posibilidades.. 1994)
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: El estipe se usa como pilote de las casas (palafitos). Los frutos maduros al caer al suelo sirven de cebo para algunos animales silvestres que cazan las comunidades para completar su alimentación. Los frutos los consumo el conejo (Agouti paca) y la tatabra ( Tayassu tajacu). Las hojas se usan para elaborar canastos, en los cuales se guardan los cangrejos comestibles (Cardiosoma crassum) capturados en el manglar con le fin de transportarlos a la casa o a los sitios de venta. Además, la estipe de esta palma se machaca y se usa como cuerda de amarre para transportar las trozas de madera por el río. De los frutos maduros se obtiene un delicioso refresco por disolución del pericarpo en agua tibia. También la yema terminal de la palma se consume como palmito. (Caballero, M.R., La etnobotánica en las comunidades negras e indígenas del delta del Río Patía. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: El fruto y el cogollo son comestibles, las hojas se usan para construir techos de casa de montaña, el tronco se usa como polín para jalar madera y como puntal de plátano, el fruto es alimento de aves (pava y paletón o tucán) (Marchan, N., Etnobotánica cuantitativa de una comunidad Chachi de la Provincia de Esmeraldas, Ecuador. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsLabour toolsStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsLabour toolsStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Form the basis of significant industries: Euterpe oleracea (palm hearts), Leopoldinia piassaba (piasava fiber or chiquichiqui), and Phytelephas macrocarpa spp. Schottii (taguar or vegetable ivory). (…). Fruits from the naidí (Euterpe oleracea) are sold in the market of Buenaventura, and are used to make a juice. (Bernal, R., Demography of the Vegetable Ivory Palm Phytelephas seemannii in Colombia, and the Impact of Seed Harvesting. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Fruits are edible and used for juice and ice cream. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Frutos, cogollos. Chivé, mingao, palmito. (Vargas, G., TRANSFORMACIÓN Y ELABORACIÓN DE ALIMENTOS CON ESPECIES VEGETALES Y ANIMALES POR LAS COMUNIDADES CUBEAS DEL CUDUYARI. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Los frutos de la palma se recolectan para la elaboración de dulces, jugos y, cuando las condiciones urbanas lo permiten, de helados. El dulce de naidí, al igual que el de otras palmas como la de chapil (Oenocarpus mapora) o el milpesos (Oenocarpus bataua), se denomina pepiao. Su preparación consiste en cocinar por unos minutos las frutas (…). (…). El jugo implica el mismo proceso, (…). (…). Tanto el jugo como el pepiao de naidí se consideran, además de particularmente deliciosos, bueno pa´ la sangre, lo cual quiere decir que no sólo alimentan sino que también proveen de fuerza física y potencia sexual. En este sentido, (…), se clasifican dentro de los alimentos fríos, por lo cual son prohibidos para las mujeres recién paridas y menstruantes porque les produce una enfermedad denominada pasmo. (…). No es extraño observar algunas palmas alrededor o detrás de las casas de los ríos o, aun, de las de pequeños centros urbanos. (…). En efecto, en centros urbanos como Guapí, Tumaco o Bocas de Satinga, se puede observar en épocas de cosecha a mujeres o a niños con canastos ofreciendo frutas de naidí en los mercados o calles. (…). Para la alimentación, además de los frutos, se ha usado el cogollo, también denominado palmicha. (…). En la construcción de casa y rancho también ha sido utilizado el naidí. Los pisos y techos de las viviendas tradicionalmente se hacían de palma zancona, (Socratea exorrhiza) los primeros; y de las hojas de diferentes especies como chalar (Socratea exorrhiza, Pholidostachis dactiloides) y quitasol ( Mauritiela macroclada), lo segundos. El naidí ha sido utilizado para techar casas y rachos (…). (…). En la cosntrucción de las azoteas de las cocinas se usa, además de la guadua, el estipe de naidí. (…). Los tuqueros utilizan también estipes de naidí, (…), para construir en el monte la infraestructira que les permite extraer las trozas de madera. (…). El palmo extraído del cogollo de naidí es cortado y traído del monte (…) para venderlo a las empresas. (Restrepo, E., El naidí entre los "grupos negros" del Pacífico Sur colombiano. 1996)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionOtherStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryReproductive system and sexual healthFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionOtherStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryBlood and cardiovascular systemFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryBlood and cardiovascular systemFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryReproductive system and sexual healthFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: Planta silvestre comestible. (Triana, G., Los Puinaves del Inirida. Formas de subsistencia y mecanismos de adaptación.. 1985)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousPuinaveColombia
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousPuinaveColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Mart.: The assaí or guasaí, Euterpe oleracea and E. precatoria, represents palms dear to the heart of all Amazonian people. A flavorful brownish drink is prepared from the bluish-black fruits, (…). This drink is oftentimes allowed to ferment to provide Indians with a chicha. (…). According to the Witoto and Bora Indians on the Igaraparaná River, assaí, known as milpesillos by Colombians, was the gift of the spirit or god of rain, for which reason it is taken as a drink in ceremonies celebrated during the rainy season. There are many intrecate associations of the palm with the Witoto spirit world, (…). (Schultes, R.E., Palms and religion in the Northwest Amazon. 1974)
  • Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand: Alimentación palmito, construcción de vivienda, pilotes. Estípite. (García Cossio, F., Y.A. Ramos, J.C. Palacios, and A. Ríos, La familia Arecaceae, recurso promisorio para la economía en el Departamento del Chocó. 2002 (as Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand))
  • Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand: Como especie productora de palmito (...). (Galeano, G., R. Bernal, Palmas del Departamento de Antioquia, Región de Antioquia, Región Occidental. 1987 (as Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand))
  • Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand: Con el estípite se construyen viviendas y elaboran pilones (trillar arroz), el cogollo (palmito) se consume. (Pino, N., and H. Valois, Ethnobotany of Four Black Communities of the Municipality of Quibdo, Choco - Colombia.. 2004 (as Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand))
  • Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand: El estipe entero se usa en la construcción de ranchos, especialmente para las "azoteas" o barbacoas al aire libre, tablado que hay detrás de las casas en regiones muy pantanosas para satisfacer las necesidades de eliminación; en la confección de gallineros y otras obras, y hendido, a modo de esterilla, para las paredes. Las hojas se usan a veces en el cubrimiento de chozas, y se dice que la cobertura queda muy espesa. De los frutos se prepara una bebida similar a la «leche» de Jessenia; queda de color morado, si los frutos se usan enteros, y blanca si se remueve de ellos previamente mediante frotación manual, el epicarpo. (*). (Patiño,V.M., Palmas oleaginosas de la costa colombiana del Pacífico. 1977 (as Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand))
  • Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand: Los frutos de esta palma silvestre no son utilizados sino por algunos morenos de la localidad para bebida semejante al chocolate; (…). El mayor uso que los nativos dan a la palma "palmicha" es al estipe o tallo joven que le utilizan para cabos o amarras, después de ser golpeados de las balsas de transporte de maderas, principalmente los troncos de manglares. (Acosta-Solis, M., Tagua or vegetable ivory - a forest product of Ecuador. 1948 (as Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand))
  • Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand: Semillas y tallo. (IIAP, Investigación aplicada e implementación de buenas prácticas para el aprovechamiento y transformación sostenible de materias primas vegetales de uso artesanal en los Departamentos de Valle y Chocó. 2008 (as Euterpe cuatrecasana Dugand))