Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer, Pittieria 17: 312 (1988)

Primary tabs

http://media.e-taxonomy.eu/palmae/photos/palm_tc_17772_2.jpg

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Boliviapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Colombiapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Ecuadorpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Perupresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Venezuelapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Widespread in Central America and W South America from Mexico to Bolivia, mostly below 300 m elevation.
Distribution in Ecuador. In Ecuador it occurs E of the Andes, often in relatively large stands in flood-plain forest. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Description

  • Canopy palm. Stem solitary, to 25 m tall and 30-55 cm in diameter, sometimes with persistent bases on the distal part. Leaves arching, with twisted leaf axis so that the distal part of the blade stands in a vertical plane; pinnae to 200 on each side, regularly inserted in one plane, the central ones 120-160 cm long and 6-7 cm wide, with prominent, wavy cross veins. Inflorescence erect, ca. 1 m long, with 100-300 branches, to 30 cm long. Male flowers pale yellow, with club shaped petals 10-20 mm long, and 6 stamens of the same length as the petals. Female flowers 5-25 per branch, ca. 15 mm long. Fruits 1-4 per branch, light brown to orange at maturity, 5-12 cm long, with 1-3 seeds. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Use Record

  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Alimento. Mojojoí. Artesanías. Semilla. Construcción. Hoja. Tronco. (Forero, M.C., Aspectos etnobotánicos de uso y manejo de la familia Arecaceae (palmas) en la comunidad indígena Ticuna de Santa Clara de Tarapoto, del resguardo Ticoya del municipio de Puerto Nariño, Amazonas, Colombia.. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousTikunaColombia
    CulturalPersonal adornmentSeedsIndigenousTikunaColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTikunaColombia
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousTikunaColombia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Así, para el techado se usan hojas de canambo, yarina, madari, huayuri. Nombre científico no citado en el texto original. (Iglesias, G., Sacha Jambi- El uso de las plantas en la medicina tradicional de los Quichuas del Napo. 1989)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L. f.) Wess. Boer Vernacular names: Cadawe, carawe (adult), cadaba, caraba (leaves). Voucher: Macía et al. #1615. Uses. CO: Leaves are used for thatching the outer covering of traditional houses. The split stem is used as flexible planks for floors in modern houses. E: The endosperm, preferably immature, is edible. F: The dried stem is eventually used for fuel. O: Larvae of the beetle Rhyncophorus palmarum, living in rotting trunks, are eaten. (Macía, M.J., Multiplicity in palm uses by the Huaorani of Amazonian Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer Español: Sheebon, Shebon, Shapaja. Urarina: Seedí, Ej Lele Usos: Medicinal y cosmético — Las raíces son utilizadas en la elaboración de extractos utilizados contra la hepatitis. Construcción — Los troncos son ocasionalmente utilizados para los postes (horcones) de las viviendas, y la madera en las paredes; las hojas son utilizadas para el techado de viviendas, para su colocación solo en los bordes y/o en la cumba. Herramientas y utensilios — Las hojas jóvenes son utilizadas en la fabricación de abanicos, canastos, esteras y algunas veces para la fabricación de escobas; las larvas (suris) que son cosechadas de troncos caídos o de frutos viejos, son utilizadas como carnadas en la pesca; la madera podrida del tronco caído sirve como fertilizante para otras plantas. Alimenticio — Los frutos maduros son comestibles y consumidos crudos, cocidos son utilizados para la preparación de bebidas; el palmito es extraído para ser consumido; las semillas son colectadas para ser consumidas como almendras crudas o tostadas al fuego; las larvas de coleóptero (suris) cosechadas de los troncos en descomposición y de los frutos viejos son consumidas cocidas. Comunidad: 1–16, 18–30. Voucher: H. Balslev 6575. (Balslev, H., C. Grandez, et al., Useful palms (Arecaceae) near Iquitos, Peruvian Amazon. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemRootNot identifiedN/APeru
    OtherN/AStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    EnvironmentalSoil improversStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    OtherN/AStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodBeveragesPalm heartNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodSeedsNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    OtherN/AFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Construcción de viviendas. Para amarrar. (Huertas, B., Nuestro territorio Kampu Piyawi (Shawi). 2007)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousShawiPeru
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Construcción. Techos. (Paniagua Zambrana, N.Y., Guía de plantas útiles de la comunidad de San José de Uchupiamonas. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Edible mesocarp. Fruit. Amazon. Río Guaviare. Edible nut. Seed. Amazon. Río Guaviare. Palm heart. Stem. Amazon. Río Guaviare. Beetle larvae from decaying stem. Stem. Amazon. Río Guaviare. Fruits for cattle and pigs. Fruits. Cauca valley. Several localities. Woven backpack (catumare). Leaf. Amazonia. Río Guaviare. Mattress made of two parallel leaf fragments with interwoven pinnae. Leaf. Amazonia. Río Guaviare. Hen´s nests made from woven leaves. Leaf. Amazonia. Río Guaviare. The whole palm as an ornamental tree. The whole plant. Cauca valley. Many localities. (…). SAP FOR FERMENTED BEVERAGE. (…). Along the Guaviare River, where sap is occasionally extracted by colonists, taller palms are said to produce up to 3.7 liters per day. (…). In many small villages of the Caribbean coast and along the Guaviare River, it is still common to see most houses thatched with this palm, (…). (…). BEETLE LARVAE BREEDING IN THE DECAYING STEMS. This use is known only in the Amazon region, where it has been recorded among the Sikuani and Piapoco of the río Guaviare, and the Yukuna of the río Caquetá. (Bernal, R., G. Galeano, N. García, I.L. Olivares, and C. Cocomá, Uses and perspectives of the wine palm, Attalea butyracea, in Colombia. 2009)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousPiapocoColombia
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousYucunaColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesStemColonoN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousSikuaniColombia
    Animal FoodFodderFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousPiapocoColombia
    Human FoodFoodSeedsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    OtherN/AEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Four palm species also provide edible seeds (Attalea butyracea and A. phalerata, Bactris major var. infestans and Astrocaryum murumuru). (…). Edible oil is extracted from the fruits and/or seeds of Bactris gasipaes, Attalea phalerata, A. Butyracea and Jessenia bataua. Therefore, the fruits or seeds are ground and boiled in water so that the oil accumulates on the surface. The latter is decanted and heated once more to remove residue water. (…). The entire leaves of Attalea butyracea are folded or cut longitudinally along the central rachis( figure 8.18E & F). The leaves (entire and folded or leaf-halves) are placed imbricately on the spaced out culms of Gynerium sagittarum, or on the split trunks of Iriartea deltoidea or Socratea exorrhiza that constitute the outer roof construction (shown in figure 8.17). (…). The roof ridge is frequently covered with a number of large leaves of A. butyracea or A. phalerata. (…). Noteworthy is the use of beetle larvae tuyutuyu (Rhynchophorus palmarum) that feed on palm seeds (Attalea phalerata, A. Butyracea (figure 8.21M) and Astrocaryum murumuru), as bait for large fish species. (…). The second broom type is smaller and mostly used inside the house. It consists of a bundle of rigid pinna costae of various palm species such as Astrocaryum murumuru, A. phalerata, A. butyracea, Jessenia bataua and Iriartea deltoidea. (…). Occasionally, an improvised rucksack can be made in the forest with the leaves of Attalea butyracea for transporting game meat or any kind of vegetal resource. (…). Oil extracted from the fruits and/or seeds of Ricinis communis, Jatropha curcas, Attalea phalerata, A. butyracea, Bactris gasipaes and Socratea exorrhiza is occasionally used to fuel oil lamps. (…). Conditioner oils are obtained from the fruits or seeds of most palms trees, such as Attalea phalerata, A. butyracea, Bactris gasipaes, Euterpe precatoria, Jessenia bataua, Socratea exorrhiza and Astrocaryum murumuru. (Thomas, E., Quantitative Ethnobotanical Research on Knowledge and Use of Plants for Livelihood among Quechua, Yuracaré and Trinitario Communities in the Andes and Amazon Regions of Bolivia.. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    CulturalCosmeticsSeedsIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    FuelFirewoodSeedsIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    OtherN/ASeedsIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Human FoodOilsSeedsIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticLeaf rachisIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: In the forest survey it was indicated, that larvae form rotting trunks of Mauritia flexuosa and seeds of Attalea butyracea (...) were roasted and eaten as delicacies.(...). Food. Seeds. (Stagegaard, J., M. Sørensen, and L.P. Kvist, Estimations of the importance of plant resources extracted by inhabitants of the Peruvian Amazon flood plains. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodSeedsMestizoN/APeru
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Las hojas se utilizan para la fabricación de techos. (…). De las semillas se extrae aceite que se usa para mantener la buena salud del cabello y cuero cabelludo. También se utiliza para curar la tos y la bronquitis. (…). Sus semillas son depredadas por brúquidos (Janzen 1983), un tipo de escarabajo cuya larva se extrae de la semilla para ser utilizada como carnada por los pescadores. La bráctea floral se quema y sus cenizas se utilizan para masticar la coca. (Gutiérrez-Vásquez, C.A. and R. Peralta, Palmas comunes de Pando, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryRespiratory systemSeedsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    OtherN/ASeedsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    CulturalRecreationalBractNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    CulturalCosmeticsSeedsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Las hojas son usadas para techado y se dice que dura hasta 10-15 años. Los frutos son comestibles, pero con un reducido jugo del mesocarpo y menos gustosos que de Attalea phalerata; las semillas son comestibles; las larvas encontradas en los frutos son usadas como cebo para pesca artesanal. (Moraes, M., Contribución al estudio del ciclo biológico de la palma Copernicia alba en un área ganadera (Espíritu, Beni, Bolivia). 1991)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodSeedsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    OtherN/AFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Las mujeres son las que tejen las esteras. Las mujeres cortan el cogollo (la hoja nueva que todavia no está abierta) de la palmera shebón para tejer las esteras. (…). Entonces las usan para las paredes de las habitaciones de su casa. Con ese mismo material tejen una estera más pequeña para poner un mono choro (cocinado, para comerlo). También tejen esteras para poner carne de sachavaca y de otros animales. (Romanoff, S., D. Manquid, F. Shoque, and D.W. Fleck, La vida tradicional de los Matsés. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesSpear leafIndigenousMatsésPeru
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticSpear leafIndigenousMatsésPeru
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Ninguna de las casas de Santa Rita tiene el techo tejido con esta palma, excepto la del taller de cerámica, sin embargo los informantes sabían que esta palma se usa para techos. De acuerdo a los informantes de esta zona los frutos son comestibles y además, son consumidos por diferentes animales como ardilla, guatusa, guanta y guatín. (Balslev, H., M. Rios, G. Quezada and B. Nantipa, Palmas útiles en la cordillera de los Huacamayos. 1997)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Roof thatch. (Shepard, G.H., D.W. Yu, M. Lizarralde, et al., Rain forest habitat classification among the Matsigenka of the Peruvian Amazon. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousMatsigenkaPeru
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Seeds are edible and very appreciated, rich in oil and vitamins, the immature endosperm has a taste like coconut. Leaves are used for thatch. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Sus hojas son utilizadas para techar infraestructuras tradicionales. Es una de las palmeras con más demanda para el techado de infraestructuras, debido a su larga duración. (Mendoza, D.E. and A. Panduro, El tejido de las hojas de palmera en la vivienda amazónica. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionBridgesEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Sus hojas son utilizadas para techar viviendas rurales. Sus semillas son comestibles al igual que el "palmito" que es de buena calidad. (Moreno Suárez, L., and O.I. Moreno Suárez, Colecciones de las palmeras de Bolivia. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodSeedsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: Techado. Hoja. Alim. animal. Fruto. (Cerón, C.E., C. Montalvo, C.I. Reyes, and, D. Andi, Etnobotánica Quichua Limoncocha, Sucumbíos-Ecuador. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: The constructors of houses choose the species based on the planned lifetime of the building, available labor time and the durability of the construction material. For making the roof, the leaves of palms such as jatata (Geonoma deversa) palla (Attalea butyracea), patujú, hoja redonda (Chelyocarpus chuco), asai and motacú are used. (Henkemans, A., Tranquilidad and Hardship in the Forest: Livelihoods and Perceptions of Camba Forest dwellers in the northern Bolivian Amazon. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafMestizoN/ABolivia
  • Attalea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) Wess.Boer: The roof is thatched with an outer layer of large palm leaves (mainly Attalea butyracea, Oenocarpus bataua, or Phytelephas tenuicaulis) and an inner layer of smaller palm leaves. G. macrostachys is the species most used for this inner thatch, but other Geonoma spp. Are used when there is shortage of G. macrostachys leaves (…). (Svenning, J.C., and M.J. Macía, Harvesting of Geonoma macrostachys Mart. leaves for thatch: an exploration of sustainability. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: Diarrhea. Roots. Preparation drunk. Hair care. Seed. External aplication. (Alexiades, M.N., Ethnobotany of the Ese Ejja: plants, health, and change in an amazonian society. 1999 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: Edible fruit. (Phillips, O.L., The potential for harvesting fruits in tropical rainforests: new data from Amazonian Peru. 1993 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: Edible karnels having the nutty flavor of semi-dry coconut meat are produced by species of Attalea ( A. amygdalina, A. nucifera, A. septuagenata, A. uberrima, A. victoriana), Orbignya (O. cuatrecasana), Parascheelea (P. anchistopetala), and Scheelea ( S. butyracea, S. magdalenica). (Dugand, A., Palms of Colombia. 1961 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: El albumen, parte comestible del coco llamado comercialmente "copra" por ser rico en aceites y grasa, se emplea en la industria como materia prima para la manteca vegetal. Son así mismo utilizados en esta fabricación en Colombia los frutos del Corozo oleifera (HBK.) Bailey, " Noli" (en Bolivar), la Scheelea butyracea (Mutis) Karst. Ex Wendl., "palma de cuezo" y otras más. (García Barriga, H., Flora Medicinal de Colombia. Botánica Médica. 1974 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: In Bogotá, and perhaps other cities as well, thousands of palma de vino (wine palm) (…) leaves are sold for the same purpose. (Palm Sunday celebrations). (…). The sap of the palma del vino (…) is extracted by cuting the palm, and then fermenting it until it becomes a whitish wine. (Bernal, R., Demography of the Vegetable Ivory Palm Phytelephas seemannii in Colombia, and the Impact of Seed Harvesting. 1998 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: Las hojas se aprovechan desde la Colonia para cubrir chozas y sombrear viveros; el cogollo se vende con el nombre de palmito, para comerlo cocido; la nuez del fruto exprimida o en agua caliente, da manteca de palma usada en la alimentación y para el alumbrado; cortado por el tronco y excavado cerca al cogollo en forma de copa, se llena de líquido que fermentado constituye un vino de palma sabroso y medicinal, y, finalmente, las hojas jóvenes suministran excelente fibra. (…). La médula de las astiles jóvenes, es muy blanca, compacta y sabe a coco. El ganado la busca con deleite como lo pude ver en Guarinocito, cuando derribaban palmas con bulldozer. (…). La palma de cuesco se halla al occidente de Cundinamarca, sólo en los climas más calientes, alrededor de 500 a 1000 metros sobre el nivel del mar. (Pérez-Arbeláez, E., Plantas útiles de Colombia. 1956 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: Los frutos de motacú son comestibles, aunque supuestamente la parte carnosa amarilla anaranjada se vuelve más gruesa conforme uno se desplaza hacia el este del país. En Riberalta, Beni, los frutos se venden en el Mercado. (…). De las semillas de motacú se puede extraer un aceite capilar. (…). Este aceite es popular en toda Bolivia, y deja el cabello sano, brillante y oloroso. Se dice que pueden obtenerse entre cuatro y seis litros por año de un buen árbol. Una botella de 200 ml cuesta 25 bolivianos en La Paz. (…). El motacú tiene diversos usos en la construcción de casas. Sus hojas se pueden usar para la confección de cestas provisionales, de sombreros o de abanicos utilizados para avivar el fuego. De sus semillas caídas se puede extraer una larva que se utiliza como cebo para pescar. El peciolo del motacú se utiliza ocasionalmente como mango para escobas. (…). Las raíces del motacú se pueden utilizar en forma análoga a las del asaí. (…). Cuando se abren nuevos chacos para el cultivo, los motacúes se dejan a menudo por su importancia para los techados y su resistencia natural al fuego. Además proporcionana sombra para el ganado. (…). Aceite capilar de motacú, producto comercializable. (…). El cuarto método no emplea jatata. Dos hojas de motacú o palma marfil, que son pinnadas, se superponen a lo largo del raquis de forma que las pinnas se doblen hacia atrás unas sobre otras como las alas de una mariposa al cerrarse. (Proctor, P., J. Pelham, B. Baum, C. Ely, M.A. Rogríguez-Girones, Expedición de la Universidad de Oxford a Bolivia. Investigación etnobotánica de las Palmae en el noroeste del departamento de Pando. 25 junio-7 de septiembre de 1992. Informe final: Secci... (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))
  • Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.: Uso medicinal. (Pacheco, T., R. Burga, P.A. Angulo, and J. Torres, Evaluación de Bosques Secundarios de la zona de Iquitos. 1998 (as Scheelea butyracea (Mutis ex L.f.) H.Karst. ex H.Wendl.))

Bibliography

A. Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador
B. World Checklist of Arecaceae