Korthalsia scortechinii Becc., Fl. Brit. India 6: 475 (1893)

Primary tabs

http://media.e-taxonomy.eu/palmae/photos/palm_tc_106406_2.jpg

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Malayapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Thailandpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Penang, Perak, Pahang, Selangor, Negri Sembilan, Malacca, Singapore: Endemic. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Discussion

  • K. scortechinii has been confused with K. echinometra', the latter species has highly inflated, less elongate ocrea armed with shining massive spines to 8 cm long, and bears even more narrowly lanceolate leaflets. Furthermore K. echinometra seems to be a plant of ridge-tops or poor soils rather than lower hillslopes. I have never seen the two species growing together. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Biology And Ecology

  • Apparently widespread and possibly overlooked, in lowland and hill Dipterocarp forest up to 900 m altitude (at Genting Highlands), apparently favouring lower hillslopes rather than ridge tops. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Common Name

  • rotan dahan, rotan semut (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Etymology

  • Rev. Father Scortechini - plant collector in Perak, 1845 - 1886 (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Uses

  • Cane apparently durable but of poor appearance. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Description

  • Clustering high-climbing rattan branching in the forest canopy. Stems often more than 20 m tall, by 1.0 - 1.5 cm in diameter without sheaths, 1.5 - 2.0 cm with sheaths. Inter-nodes to about 25 cm long below, much shorter near inflorescences above. Sheaths dull green rather sparsely spiny ± entirely covered by the elongate inflated ocrea; ocrea dull pale brown up to about 20 cm long by 4 cm in diameter, shorter and proportionally wider on sheaths by the inflorescences, covered with scattered short spines, not exceeding 8 mm in length and usually much less, and caducous chocolate-coloured scales, sometimes almost unarmed. Ants usually abundant in ocrea. Whole leaf up to 2.5 m on juvenile stems, usually shorter on mature climbing stems; petiole about 10 cm, cirrus up to about 1.25 m; up to 11 leaflets on each side, rather narrowly rhomboid, up to 30 cm long by 5 cm wide, the upper V* only praemorse, dark dull green above, whitish below but not densely so. Up to 6 of the uppermost nodes producing inflorescences, each with up to 10 flower bearing branches to 25 cm long by 8 mm in diameter. Flowers not known. Mature fruit described by Furtado as being 20 mm long by 9-11 mm wide, covered in 16-18 vertical rows of scales. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Bibliography

A. J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979
B. World Checklist of Arecaceae