Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav., Syst. Veg. Fl. Peruv. Chil. : 298 (1798)

Primary tabs

http://media.e-taxonomy.eu/palmae/photos/palm_tc_102648_5.jpg

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Boliviapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Brazil Northpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Colombiapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Costa Ricapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Ecuadorpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Nicaraguapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Panamápresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Perupresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Venezuelapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Central America to Ecuador W of the Andes, and in the W part of the Amazon region from Venezuela to Bolivia. Perhaps the most common native tree species in Ecuador, occurring in all provinces that include moist lowland areas. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Discussion

  • The holotype of Iriartea deltoidea consists of five sheets with a seedling, section of leaf, and piece of rachilla with pistillate flowers. The iso type is similar. This species is interpreted from the type, description, and a more recent collection from the type locality (Henderson 537).

    The type of Deckeria corneto consists of four sheets, with a leaf section and rachillae with sta-minate and pistillate flowers. This species is interpreted from the type, description, and other collections from at or near the type locality (Henderson et al. 119, Triana 1733-2, Dugand &Ja-ramillo 2921, Moore & Dietz 9865). Karsten described the species as having 16-20 stamens. The type has 15 stamens, and Henderson et al. 119 has 13-14. Karsten's count is considered incorrect, and D. corneto is not maintained.

    The type of Iriartea ventricosa consists of a single sheet with a leaf section only. Dugand (1942) believed that the type locality could be in present-day Colombia. This species is interpreted from the type and the description. Martius distinguished his new species on its ventricose stem, pinna shape, and villose staminate calyx. The character of the stem swelling is of no significance. It is usual in Iriartea for lowland populations below ca. 300 m to have markedly swollen stems, and for upland populations to have more or less cylindrical stems. However, there are many exceptions in any population, and the character is physiological, and not of any taxo-nomic significance. The characters of the pinna shape and calyx trichomes are of little importance. All Iriartea specimens examined with young staminate flowers have villose sepals, but these trichomes soon fall from the sepals.

    The type of Iriartea phaeocarpa consists of a seedling only, which is illustrated in Martius (1847). This species is interpreted from the type, the description, from Martius (1847), and more recent collections from near the type locality (Nee & Solomon 30325). Martius recognized that this species was similar to I. ventricosa, but distinguished it by its few peduncular bracts, pinnae size, and fruit size. The number of peduncular bracts, three, is obviously based on a misinterpretation, probably most had fallen when the illustration was made. The illustration is, in any case, incomplete (Burret, 1930). Pinnae shape and fruit size are not considered significant.

    The type of Iriartea gigantea consists of leaf sections and rachillae with staminate and pistillate flowers. This species is interpreted from the type, the description, and from recent collections from at or near the type locality (Moore 6574, Moore & Parthasarathy 9413, Tomlinson 65B, Henderson 42). Burret distinguished his new species by its thicker rachillae with seven series of triads, and by its longer fruit. These differences are slight and are not considered significant.

    The type of Iriartea weberbaueri consists of approximately 30 fruits. This species is interpreted from the type and the description. Burret distinguished the species by its larger fruits and cylindrical stern. The type fruits are 2-2.5 x 2.2-2.5 cm, and easily fall within the range observed in other specimens. As discussed above, the character of the stem swelling is of no taxonomic significance.

    The type of Iriartea megalocarpa is no longer extant at B, and no isotypes are known. A recent collection from the type locality, the neotype, is typical Iriartea deltoidea. (Henderson, A. 1990. Introduction and the Iriarteinae. Flora Neotropica Monograph 53.)C

Uses

  • The outer part of the stems are used throughout its range for building purposes, e.g., floors, posts, poles; also for blowguns, bows, harpoons and arrow points; and also for firewood. The leaves are used for thatching and basketry. The heart and seeds are occasionally eaten. The inside layer of the leaf sheath is used to give women strength in labor (Shemluck & Ness 163, Ecuador). Hollowed-out stems are used as coffins by Embera Indians in Colombia (R. Bernal, pers. comm.). Steven King (pers. comm.) reports that in northern Peru Angotere-Secoya and Quechua people use the stems of I. deltoidea as canoes. Large specimens are selected and carefully felled. The soft central ground tissue is removed from the center of the stem, and base and apex fashioned into bow and stern. The canoes are widely used for shortening trips, especially long overland trips where short-cuts can be made by river. Canoes last about two or three months. Such is the demand for these temporary canoes that many of the larger specimens of Iriartea have been felled in this area. Rodrigo Bernal (pers. comm.) reports that in Colombia the Embera Indians of the Choco tie the stems together and use them as rafts. Since these are so heavy they are only used for downstream travel. (Henderson, A. 1990. Introduction and the Iriarteinae. Flora Neotropica Monograph 53.)C

Description

  • Canopy palm. Stem to 20 m tall and 20-40 cm in diameter, often swollen in the middle. Base supported by a 1-2 m tall cone of black stilt roots, these 3-5 cm in diameter. Leaves 4-6, 3-5 m long, bushy; pinnae numerous, longitudinally split, spreading in different planes, green on both sides. Inflorescence buds 1-3 m long, downwards curved, resembling a bulls horn. Inflorescence cream coloured in flower, the numerous pendulous branches to 1.5 m long, borne on a short curved axis. Fruits dull bluish black, globose, ca. 3 cm in diameter. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A
  • Stem more or less ventricose, to 25 m tall, 10-30 cm in diam. at base, 12-70 cm in diam. at swelling, 11-23 cm in diam. at apex, gray, smooth, with nodes obscure and internodes to 30 cm long; stilt roots to 100, terete, nearly vertical, closely spaced and forming a dense cone, branched at or below ground level, to 2 m x 3.5 cm, black, with sharp spines. Leaves 4-7, stiffly spreading; sheath forming a crownshaft, 60-150 cm long, glaucous, green, outer surface with brown or white scales; petiole terete, 2-13 x 3 cm (to 40 cm long when including narrow, apical, petiolar part of sheath), green, densely brown-tomentose; rachis ridged adaxially, rounded abaxially, 2-4.3 m long, densely whitish-tomentose abaxially, densely whitish-brown-tomentose adaxially; pinnae 15-27 per side of rachis, alternate, stiff, coriaceous, deltate with praemorse distal margins, lustrous green glabrous above, green glabrous below except for dense brown villi at base and on veins or occasionally villous overall, occasionally below with lines ca. 3 mm wide of dense white or brown tomentum running parallel to veins, the middle pinnae split to the base into numerous segments, the proximal one of a pinna largest and pendulous and all the distal ones smaller and pointing up and away from the axis and giving the leaf a two-ranked appearance (juvenile plants with entire pinnae); proximal pinna entire, 6-28 cm long, 0.5-8 cm wide at mid-point, erect; middle pinnae split into as many as 18 segments, the proximal one 50-98(-122) cm long and 3-8(-47) cm wide at mid-point and the distal one 19-34 cm long and 1-2.5 cm wide at mid-point; apical pinna entire, flabellate, 35-38 cm long, 17 cm wide at mid-point. Inflorescence pendulous at anthesis, to 2 m long, buds developing below crownshaft and erect at first, soon becoming de-curved and eventually horn-shaped; peduncle terete, curved, 20-44 cm long, half-encircling stem and then abruptly narrowing to 2-6 cm in diam., densely brown-velvety-tomentose, at anthesis with up to 16 bract scars; prophyll inserted at base of peduncle, triangular, bicarinate, 8 cm long, 7 cm wide at base, early caducous; peduncular bracts to 15, caducous as bud elongates, terete, with acute apex, splitting abaxially, the first ca. six similar to and only slightly longer than the prophyll, the remaining ca. nine longer, terete, horn-shaped eventually up to 120 cm long, sometimes an incomplete bract of variable size present; prophyll and peduncular bracts tomen-tose on the outside like the peduncle; rachis 14-46 cm long, of same diam. as peduncle at base and tapering into distal rachillae; rachillae 23-37, all simple or more often the proximal few bifurcate, at base with 3-6 cm swollen, flattened, sterile section, ± equal in length, 80-140 cm long, 5-8 mm diam. at mid-point, subtended by a vestigial bract, glabrous; triads in as many as seven spirally arranged series, 2-6 mm apart, vestigially bracteate;flowers proximally in triads (rarely tetrads with two pistillate), distally sta-minate in pairs or solitary, or often all in an inflorescence staminate, yellowish at anthesis; staminate flowers up to 7 mm long; sepals depressed-ovate, imbricate, very briefly connate below, 2.5-3 x 2-4 mm, fleshy, gibbous, covered with long, stiff, caducous hairs; petals ovate-oblong, valvate, 7x3 mm; stamens (10-)12-15(-17); filaments triangular, 0.5 mm long; anthers linear, latrorse, sub-basifixed, 4-5 mm long; pistillode minute or absent; pollen with intectate, clavate exine; pistillate flowers 4 mm long; sepals fleshy, imbricate, 4-5 x 5 mm, ciliate; petals imbricate below, valvate above, fleshy, 4-5 x 5 mm; staminodes 10-13, adnate to base of petals, 1.5-2 mm long, apiculate; ovary 3-5 mm long, triangular in cross-section, 3-locular; stigmas sessile, triangular, 1 mm long, 1 mm diam. at base, erect at anthesis; fruit globose, 2-2.7 x 2.4-2.8 cm including persistent expanded perianth; stigmatic residue sub-apical to apical; epicarp glabrous, greenish-yellow at maturity and splitting irregularly from apex; mesocarp whitish, granular, fibrous; endocarp papery; seed globose, 1.5 cm diam., basally attached; raphe branches anastomosing; hilum rounded; embryo sub-apical to lateral; eophyll entire. (Henderson, A. 1990. Introduction and the Iriarteinae. Flora Neotropica Monograph 53.)C

Materials Examined

  • COSTA RICA. ALAJUELA: Cataratasde San Ramon, 28 Feb 1931 (ft), Brenes 13566 (F, MO, NY); vie. of Guatuso de San Rafael, on Rio Frio, 10°43'N, 84°48'W, 80-100 m, 4 Aug 1949 (fr), Holm & Iltis 912 (BH, MO). HEREDIA: Finca La Selva on Rio Puerto Viejo just E of its junction with Rio Sarapiqui, Starkey's Woods, 8 Dec 1984 (fl, fr), Henderson 42 (NY); 28 Jan 1967, Moore & Parthasarathy 9413 (BH); 17 Aug 1965, Tomlinson 17viii65B (BH); Rio Cuarto, 14 Mar 1945, Langlois 11 (BH); between Corazon de Jesus and La Virgen, Rio Sarapiqui, 340 m, 24 Mar 1953, Moore 6574 (BH). LIMON: Los Angeles de Siquirres, 3 km W and 1.9 km S of Guayacan, hwy. to Limon, 1000 m, 6 May 1983 (fl, fr), Gomez et al. 20529 (MO, NY); Finca Montecristo, on Rio Re-ventazon below Cairo, 25 m, 18-19 Feb 1926, Standley & Valeria 48950 (US). PUNTARENAS: 5 km W of Rincon de Osa, Osa Peninsula, 8°42'N, 83-31'W, 50-200 m, 24-30 Mar 1973 (fl), Burger & J. Gentry 8909 (MO, PMA, US); Esquinas Ridge, Osa Peninsula, 150-250 m, Jan 1983 (fl, fr), Gomez 19688 (MO, NY); 7 km from Chacarita on rd. to Rincon de Osa, 150 m, 21 Dec 1984 (fl), Henderson 65 (NY); above airport, Rincon de Osa, 20-300 m, 11 Feb 1974 (fl, fr), Liesner 2067 (MO, NY); above Palmar Norte, 600 m, 6 Mar 1953, Moore 6524 (BH); before El Cedral on trail from Palmar Norte to Maiz, 740 m, 12 Mar 1955, Moore 6555 (BH). PANAMA. COCLE: Rd. from La Pintado to Coclesito, 8°45'N, 80°30'W, 600 m, 7 Feb 1983 (fl), Hamilton & Davidse 2824 (NY). COLON: Santa Rita Ridge, E of Transisthmian Hwy., 300-500 m, 16 Dec 1972 (fr), Gentry 6559 (MO); COMARCA DE SAN BLAS: El Llano-Carti rd., nr. Nusagandi, 13 Jan 1985 (fl), Henderson 87 (NY). PANAMA: 4-6 km N of El Llano on El Llano-Carti rd., 200 m, 11 Nov 1974, Moore et al. 10185 (BH); Gorgas Memorial Labs. Yellow Fever Research Camp, ca. 25 km NE of Cerro Azul on Rio Piedras, 550 m, 24 Nov 1974 (fl), Mori & Kallunki 3455 (BH, MO, PMA).?COLOMBIA. AMAZONAS: Between Rio Loreto Yacu and Rio Amaca Yacu, 20 Dec 1945 (fr), Duque-Jaramillo 2400 (COL); Loreto Yacu, ca. 100 m, Mar 1946 (fr), Schultes 7153 (BH, GH); Rio Apaporis, Soratama, nr. mouth of Rio Cananari, 7 Dec 1951 (fl), Schultes & Cabrera 14873 (GH, NY). ANTIOQUIA: Mun. de Frontino, Murri, La Blanquita, 815 m, 22 Mar 1982 (fl, fr), Bernal & Galeano 300 (COL, NY); 18 Feb 1985, Henderson & Bernal 142 (COL, JAUM, NY). CAQUETA: Between Florencia and Venecia, 400 m, 31 Mar 1940 (fl), Cuatrecasas 8946 (COL); Cordillera Oriental, Sucre, 1000-1300 m, 4 Apr 1940 (fl), Cuatrecasas 9099 (COL); rd. between Altamira and Florencia, nr. Florencia, 1000 m, 10 Feb 1985 (fr), Henderson & Bernal 133 (COL, JAUM, NY); Morelia, 150-300 m, 13 Oct 1941 (fl), Sneidern 1125 (COL); Hetucha, Rio Orte guaza, 30 Jul 1926 (fl), Woronow & Juzepczuk 6319 (LE). CHOCO: Hydro camp no. 14, Rio Salaqui, 6 days upstream from Rio Sucio, 200 m, 23 May 1967, Duke 11342(7) (BH); region of Rio Baudo, 2 Feb-29 Mar 1967, Fuchs et al. 22055 (COL); trail from Unguia to Cerro Mali, lowest slopes of Serrania del Darien, 300-500 m, 20 Jan 1975 (fr), Gentry & Mori 13738 (BH, COL, MO); vie. of Rio Tigre base camp, base of Serrania del Darien, W of Unguia, 300 m, 17 Jul 1975 (fr), Gentry & Aguirre 15223 (BH, COL, MO). META: Between Villavicencio and Rio Ocoa, rd. of Guayuriba, Montenegro, 450 m, 24 Feb 1941, Dugand& Jaramillo 2921 (COL); 10 km S of Acacias, nr. Rio Negro, 3 Feb 1985 (fl, fr), Henderson et al. 119 (COL, JAUM, NY); nr. Rio Guamal just beyond Guamal on rd. from Villavicencio to San Martin, 6 Sep 1970 (fl, fr), Moore & Dietz 9865 (BH, COL); Llanos of San Martin and Villavicencio, 250 m, Jan 1836 (fl), Triana 1733-2 (COL). PUTUMAYO: Rio Putumayo, at Puerto Ospina, 230 m, 14 Nov 1940 (fl, fr), Cuatrecasas 10566 (COL); Rio Putumayo, La Conception, 225 m, 27 Nov 1940 (fl), Cuatrecasas 10815 (COL); Rio San Miguel, Quebrada de la Hormiga, 290 m, 16 Dec 1940 (fl), Cuatrecasas 11127 (COL); between Quebrada de la Hormiga and San Antonio del Guamues, 330 m, 18 Dec 1940 (fl), Cuatrecasas 11153 (COL); Mocoa, Quebrada of Rio Afan, 570-680 m, 27 Dec 1940 (fl, fr), Cuatrecasas 11328 (COL); Pepino nr. Mocoa, 4000 ft, 21 Nov 1946 (fr), Foster & Foster 2215 (A, BH, COL); Rio Putumayo opposite mouth of Rio Gueppi, on border with Ecuador and Peru, 200 m, 19 May 1978 (fr), Gentry & Diaz 22123 (F); Rio San Miguel or Sucumbios, Santa Rosa, 380 m, 7-8 Apr 1942, Schultes 3549 (BH, GH). VALLE: Pacific coast, between El Aguacate and Quebrada de la Yuca, 10-40 m, 8 Feb 1944, Cuatrecasas 16080 (COL); Rio Calima, La Trojita, 5-50 m, 19 Feb-10 Mar 1944 (fl, fr), Cuatrecasas 16369 (COL); 19 Feb-10 Mar 1944, Cuatrecasas 16369A (COL); ibid., 19 Feb-10 Mar 1944, Cuatrecasas 16475 (COL); Pacific coast, Rio Cajambre, 5-80 m, 5-15 May 1944 (fl), Cuatrecasas 17493 (COL, US); Cordillera Occidental, Rio Anchicaya, nr. La Cascada, 340 m, 29 Mar 1947 (fl), Cuatrecasas 24012 (COL, F, US); La Trojita, 1 hour downstream from Baja Calima, 0-50 m, 9 Apr 1976 (fl), Moore et al. 10227 (BH). VAUPES: Yurupari, Rio Vaupes, 25 Oct 1939 (fr), Cuatrecasas 7301A (COL, US); Rio Guaviare, 240 m, 9 Nov 1939 (fl, fr), Cuatrecasas 7620 (US). VENEZUELA. AMAZONAS: Neblina base camp, Rio Mawarinuma, 0°50'N, 66°10'W, 140 m, 6 Feb 1984 (fr), Henderson 17 (NY, VEN). BOLIVAR: Rio Parami-chi between mouth of Rio Paramichi and Chalimano, 4°2-12'N, 63°1-5'W, 525-625 m, 8-9 Jan 1962 (fl, fr), Steyermark 90777 (BH, MO, VEN).?ECUADOR. ESMERALDAS: Playa de Oro, 60 m, 30 Apr 1943, Little 6397B (BH, NY). EL ORO: 14 km W of Pinas on new rd. to Santa Rosa, 600 m, 8 Oct 1979, Dodson et al. 9004 (BH, NY). Los Rios: Path of ridge line at El Centinela at crest of Montanas de Ila on rd. from Patricio Pilar to 24 de Mayo at km 12, 600 m, 13 Feb 1982 (fl), Dodson & Gentry 12366 (MO). MORONA-SANTIAGO: E side of Rio Zamora ca. 3 km downstream from inlet of Rio Chuchumbleza, 3°32'S, 78°30'W, 800m, 21 Sep 1983 (fi), Balslev & Brandbyge 4414 (NY); 25 km SW of Taisha, 2°32'S, 77°43'W, 450 m, Sep 1976 (fl), Onega 103 (US). NAPO: Estacion Experimental de INIAP, San Carlos, 6 km SE of Los Sachos, 250 m, 7 Apr 1985 (fr), Baker & Trushell 5922 (NY); Palma Oriente Plantation, ca. 20 km N of Coca, 0°17'S, 77°3'W, 300 m, 16 Jun 1983 (fl, fr), Balslev & Brako 4314 (NY); nr. confluence of Rio Cuyabeno and Rio Tarapuy in Reserva Faunistica Cuyabeno, 0°5'S, 76°10'W, 230 m, 22 Jul 1983 (fl), Balslev & Cox 4322 (NY); Comuna San Jose de Payamino at Rio Payami-no, 4-5 hours upstream from Coca, 0°30'S, 77°18'W, 1-7 Dec 1983 (fl), Balslev & Irvine 4631 (NY); Rio Eno, S side at limit of Secoya Reserve, Vi hour in canoe from confluence with Rio Cuyabeno, 0°18'S, 76°20'W, 300 m, 20 Feb 1984, Balslev 4865 (NY); confluence of Rio Quiwado and Rio Tiwaeno, 11 Apr 1981 (fr), Davis & Yost 929 (NY); Dureno on Rio Aguarico, n.d., Pink-ley s.n. (BH); Anangu, 0°31-32'S, 76°23'W, 260-350 m, 30 May-21 Jun 1982, SEF8517 (NY); Rio Aguarico, Shushufindi, 244 m, 21 Dec 1974 (fl, fr), Vickers 58 (F); Araki on Rio Guataracu, 10 hours W of Coca, 0°40'S, 77°20'W, 25 Oct 1960 (fl), Whitmore 834 (K). PASTAZA: 4 km S of Shell towards Madre Tierra, just W of Puyo, 1°30'S, 78°3'W, 1050 m, 16 Mar 1983 (fr), Balslev & Brako 4278 (NY); Rio Chico, 10 km S of Puyo, 1-30'S, 77°55'W, ca. 1000 m, Aug 1979, Shem-luck & Ness 163 (BH). PICHINCHA: N bank of Rio Toache E of Santo Domingo de los Colorados, 0°15'S, 79°7'W, 600 m, 19-21 Mar 1986 (fl, fr), Balslev et al. 62001 (AAU, NY); Rio Toache, nr. Colonia La Mag-dalena, km 103 on Quito rd. from Santo Domingo de los Colorados, 600 m, 22 Feb 1967, Moore & Parthasarathy 9491 (BH).?PERU. AMAZONAS: Above Quebrada Tuhusik, 5 min down river from Chavez Valdivia, Rio Cenepa, ca. 250 m, 16 Dec 1972 (fr), Berlin 546 (BH, MO); Mitallar, 2 km from La Poza, Rio Santiago, 180 m, 17 Aug 1979 (fr), Pena 107 (MO). Cuzco: Prov. Paucartambo, nr. Pilcopata on rd. Pilcopata to Patria, 720 m, 6 Feb 1975 (fr), Plowman & Davis 5012 (BH, GH). HUANUCO: Prov. Huanuco, Tingo Maria, 16 Jul 1940 (fl), Asplund 12278 (S); nr. confluence of Rio Cayumba with Rio Huallaga, 875 m, 14 Oct 1936 (fr, fl), Mexia 8291 (BH, F, GH, K, MO, NY, S, UC, US); above Prato sawmill, vie. of Tingo Maria, 900-980 m, 25 Apr 1960, Moore et al. 8338 (BH); Prov. Tingo Maria, Rio Pendencia, 640-700 m, 1 May 1960, Moore et al. 8389 (BH); Prov. Pachitea, Distr. Puerto Inca, carretera marginal ca. 14 km from a point across the Rio Pachitea from Puerto Inca, 9°31'S, 74°58'W, 350 m, 13 Apr 1982 (fr), Smith 1291 (MO). JUNIN: Prov. Tarma, Rio Ulcumayo just above junction with Rio Cascas at settlement Poma-carca, ca. 12 km NW of San Ramon, 1200 m, 31 Nov 1962 (fr), Iltis & Iltis 254 (WIS); Prov. Satipo, Alto Kimiriki, 8 km from Pichinaki, 11°1'S, 74°54'W, 850 m, 29 Jun 1982 (fl, fr), Smith & Bokor 2131 (NY). LORETO: Prov. Alto Amazonas, Andoas, Rio Pastaza nr. Ecuador border, 2°48'S, 76°28'W, 210 m, 16 Aug 1980 (fr), Gentry et al 29825 (MO, NY). MADRE DE Dios: Cashu Cocha Camp, Rio Manu, Parque National de Manu, 380 m, 16 Oct 1979 (fr), Gentry et al. 26778 (BH, MO); 17 Oct 1979 (Gentry et al. 26875 (BH, MO); Prov. Tahuamanu, NW of Iberia, ca. 180 m, 7 Jun 1960, Moore et al. 8558 (BH); Prov. and Dist. Tambopata, Tambopata Reserve, junction of Rio Tambopata and Rio La Torre, 250 m, 26 Mar 1981 (fr), Young 189 (NY). PASCO: Rio Palacuzu, between km 51 and 60 of new rd. in construction NW of Villa Rica toward Puerto Bermudez, 10°30'S, 75°5'W, 700 m, 4 Mar 1982 (fr), Gentry & Smith 35999 (BH, MO, NY); Prov. Oxapampa, 1 km beyond Pozuzo, 823 m, 15 Dec 1985 (fr), Henderson 537 (NY, USM); Prov. Oxapampa, Palcazu valley, Rio San Jose in the Rio Chuchurras drainage, 10°9'S, 75°20'W, 400-500 m, 14 May 1983, Smith 4020 (NY). SAN MARTIN: Prov. and Dist. Lamas, along Rio Curiyacu, an affluent of Rio Cumbasa, ca. 8 km above San Antonio, ca. 400 m, 5 Nov 1937, Belshaw 3586 (GH, UC, US); upper Huallaga valley, 20 km from Uchiza, 350 m, 12 Dec 1985 (fl, fr), Kahn 1842 (NY); Prov. San Martin, nr. km 20 on Tarapoto-Yurimaguas rd. on Cerro de Escalero, 980 m, 26 May 1960, Moore et al. 8531 (BH). UCAYALI: Prov. Coronel Portillo, Bosque National de von Humboldt, km 86 Pucallapa-Tingo Maria rd., 8°40'S, 75°0'W, 270 m, 7 Aug 1980 (fl), Gentry & Salazar 29430 (BH, MO, NY); Prov. Coronel Portillo, carretera marginal, 22 km S of km 86 on Pucallapa-Tingo Maria rd., 8°41'S, 75°0'W, 250 m, 11 Feb 1981 (fr), Gentry et al. 31192 (MO); Prov. Coronel Portillo, beyond vivero of Forestry Service toward Rio Manantay, km 4, Pucallapa, ca. 220 m, 5 May 1960, Moore et al. 8399 (BH).?BRAZIL. ACRE: Nr. mouth of Rio Macauhan (tributary of Rio Yaco), 9°20'S, 69°W, 2 Sep 1933 (fl), Krukoff 5739 (A, F, LE, MO, NY, UC, US). AMAZONAS: BR 319 Porto Velho-Manaus rd., 85 km N of Humaita at Bonfuturo, 7°10'S, 63°0'W, 8 Apr 1985 (fr), Henderson et al. 199 (INPA, NY); Mun. de Humaita, BR 230 Transamazonica, km 140, 15 Apr 1985 (fl), Henderson et al. 243 (INPA, NY); Rio Negro, n.d., Spruce 153-26 (K); Barreiras do Jutahi, Rio Solimoes, 18 Jan 1875 (fr), Trail 1057 (GH, K). MATO GROSSO: Angustura, SW of Machedo, Dec 1931 (fr), Krukoff 1612 (BH, F, MO).?BOLIVIA. LA PAZ: Between Tipuani and Guanay, Dec 1892 (fl, fr), Bang 1734 (A, E, F, GH, MO, NY, US); San Carlos, Mapiri, 750 m, 11 Sep 1907, Buchtien 1247 (US); Prov. Nor Yungas, 10 km by rd. N and above Caranavi, ca. 15°47'S, 67°32'W, 1400 m, 1 Nov 1984 (fl), Nee & Solomon 30323 (NY); Tumupasa, 10 Jan 1902 (fl), Williams 402 (NY, US). PANDO: Prov. Manuripi, Rio Madre de Dios, 1 km W of Humaita, 12°1'S, 68°16'W, 150 m, 29 Aug 1985 (fl), Nee 31653 (NY). (Henderson, A. 1990. Introduction and the Iriarteinae. Flora Neotropica Monograph 53.)C

Use Record

  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimentación humana. Palmito. Cuando es tierno, se corta y pela para consumir crudo en ensalada. Comercial. Semilla. Es utilizada en la elaboración de collares. Construcción. Estípite. Construcción de viviendas, en postes y vigas transversales. La parte externa es cortada el segmentos longitudinales, secada, y empleada en las paredes, suelo, y como cuerda natural. Construcción. Hoja. Techado de campamentos temporales. Utensilios y herr. de uso doméstico. Estípite. Elaboración de "guarachas" (estantes para depositar objetos). Utensilios y herr. de uso doméstico. Hoja (vaina). La vaina seca de la hoja se utiliza para hacer recipientes. (Armesilla, P.J., Usos de las palmeras (Arecaceae),en la Reserva de la Biosfera-Tierra Comunitaria de Orígen Pilón Lajas, (Bolivia). 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticLeaf sheathIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    CulturalPersonal adornmentSeedsIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimentación humana. Semilla y yema apical. (Rios, M., and J. Caballero, Las plantas en la alimentación de la comunidad Ahuano, Amazonía ecuatoriana. 1997)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodBeveragesPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimenticio. Artesanal. Construcción. (Cárdenas, D., C.A. Marín , L.S. Suárez, et al., Plantas útiles en dos comunidades del Departamento de Putumayo. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsOtherNot specifiedIndigenousHuitotoColombia
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousHuitotoColombia
    ConstructionOtherNot specifiedIndigenousHuitotoColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimenticio. El palmito de los Tuhuanu se come crudo o cocido. Construcción. El tallo de esta palmera, cuando es adulta, sirve para hacer cercos, costillas, postes y horcones de las casas; es de la misma calidad que el tronco del Macuri (Jessenia bataua). Las hojas sirven para cubrir los techos de las casas.(…). Pancho. De la corteza del tallo de los individuos tiernos de Tuhuanu se saca un pancho, que sirve para amarrar cosas. (Bourdy, G., Conozcan nuestros árboles, nuestras hierbas. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    EnvironmentalFencesStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimenticio. Larva. Artesanal. Tallo. Construcción. Tallo. Madera. Tallo. Techado. Hoja. (Cerón, C., and C. Reyes, Aspectos florísticos, ecológicos y etnobotánica de una hectárea de bosque en la comunidad Secoya Sehuaya, Sucumbíos-Ecuador. 2007)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsOtherStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    ConstructionOtherStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimenticio. Postes. Tablas. (Cerón, C.E., C.I. Reyes, L. Tonato,A. Grefa et al., Estructura, composición y etnobotánica del sendero " Ccottacco Shaiqui", Cuyabeno-Ecuador.. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousCofánEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousCofánEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimento humano, mamíferos, aves. Artesanal; cervatana, flecha, lanza. Construcción; techo. Descripción: El fruto comen directo. Utilizan el fuste o la médula. Usan la hoja. (…). Iriartea deltoidea "tepa, yarenga", Prestoea acuminata "guimawe" Geonoma macrostachys "mo", cuyo fruto consumen las personas, mamíferos y aves, además de que las hojas de las especies se tejen para la construcción de techos de las casas. El fuste de estas palmeras se utiliza artesanalmente para la elaboración de lanzas y cerbatanas. (Freire, B.H., Ethnobotany of the Huaorani communities in the Ecuadorian Northwest. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimento. Cogollo. Artesanal. Semilla. Techado. Hoja. Construcción. Estípite. Zoo-uso. Fruto. Alimento. Fruto. (Cerón, C.E., and C.I. Reyes, Parches de bosque y etnobotánica Shuar en Palora, Morona Santiago-Ecuador.. 2007)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
    OtherN/ASeedsIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimento. Cogollo. Construcción. Tallo. Techado. Hoja. (Cerón, C.E., C. Montalvo, C.I. Reyes, and, D. Andi, Etnobotánica Quichua Limoncocha, Sucumbíos-Ecuador. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimento. Larva. Artesanal. Tallo. Construcción. Tallo. Madera. Tallo. Techado. Hoja. (Cerón, C.E., A. Payaguaje, D. Payaguaje et al., Etnobotánica Secoya. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousSecoyaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Alimento. Mojojoí. Artesanias. Semilla. Construcción. Hoja. Utensilios de cocina.Tronco. (…). Aquí se encuentran catorce especies en las cuales la parte que se usa son la semillas, creando un gran numero de diseños en joyas y accesorios como pulseras, collares y aretes; las especies más representativas en este uso son la Pona, la Bacaba, el Asaí. (…). En la elaboración de corrales y cercos Figura 23.5) se encuentra la Pona, de la cual sacan la ripa (tablas del tronco) con la cual es posible la elaboración de estas construcciones. (Forero, M.C., Aspectos etnobotánicos de uso y manejo de la familia Arecaceae (palmas) en la comunidad indígena Ticuna de Santa Clara de Tarapoto, del resguardo Ticoya del municipio de Puerto Nariño, Amazonas, Colombia.. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryStemIndigenousTikunaColombia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousTikunaColombia
    EnvironmentalFencesStemIndigenousTikunaColombia
    CulturalPersonal adornmentSeedsIndigenousTikunaColombia
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousTikunaColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTikunaColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Cacería, doméstico, fuego. Con la madera del tronco de Tepahue, que es muy dura, se fabrican lanzas (Tapa) y cerbatanas. (…). Al parecer la madera que se usaba antes del conocimiento y uso de las herramientas metálicas para hacer lanzas era la de Cohuarehue (Calyptranthes plicata). (…). El tronco también se usa en la construcción de viviendas. La parte que cubre la inflorescencia (Huita), que es similar a una canoa y de color café, se ahuma para aplanarla y se usa para dormir en el bosque (usando tres, una seguida de la otra). (…). Esto también es usado como asiento. Cuando llueve (…) los huaorani usan pedazos de tronco como leña (…). Con las hojas se elabora una vasija muy simple en la cual se coloca la chicha seca (…). El jugo de los frutos macerados se pone como mascarilla cuando hay espinillas y en cinco días se acaba con ellas. (Mondragón, M.L., and R. Smith, Bete Quiwiguimamo. Salvando el bosque para vivir sano. 1997)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticNot specifiedIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    CulturalCosmeticsFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Cayapas. Wood used for blowguns, house construction, fishtraps, spears, marimba keys etc. Palm heart edible. Edible larvae collected form decomposing stems. Coaiqueres. Wood used for marimba keys. Edible larvae collected form decomposing stems. (Barfod, A., and H. Balslev, The use of palms by the Cayapas and Coaiqueres on the Coastal plain of Ecuador. 1988)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    CulturalRecreationalStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    CulturalRecreationalStemIndigenousAwáEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousAwáEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Comercializado en mercados locales. Tronco (lanzas de 1 y 2 m). Artesanal. (Alarcon, R., El taller "Etnobotánica y valoración económica de los recursos florísticos silvestres". 1994)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsOtherStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Con el estípite se construyen paredes de viviendas. (Pino, N., and H. Valois, Ethnobotany of Four Black Communities of the Municipality of Quibdo, Choco - Colombia.. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Cons. Construcción con siete especies entre las que se encuentran la guadua (Guadua angustifolia) utilizada en la estructura de las casas, palma zancona (Iriartea deltoidea) empleada para pisos (…). (Cárdenas, D., and J.G. Ramírez, Plantas útiles y su incorporación a los sistemas productivos del Departamento del Guaviare ( Amazonia Colombiana). 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción chowra. Estípite. (García Cossio, F., Y.A. Ramos, J.C. Palacios, and A. Ríos, La familia Arecaceae, recurso promisorio para la economía en el Departamento del Chocó. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción de viviendas. (Huertas, B., Nuestro territorio Kampu Piyawi (Shawi). 2007)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousShawiPeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción. (González, M.S., Flora utilizada por los Awa de Albi con énfasis en especies medicinales-estudio de Botánica Económica-. 1994)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionOtherNot specifiedIndigenousAwáColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción. Estípite. Techos. Hojas. Alimenticio. Cogollo. (...). A partir de las hojas y de los troncos de las palmas Oenocarpus bataua, Iriartea deltoidea y Socratea exorrhiza se construyen los techos, pisos y paredes de las casas. (Cerón, C.E., and C. Montalvo, Reserva Biológica Limoncocha. Formaciones vegetales, Diversidad y Etnobotánica.. 2000)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción. Hoja. Techado de viviendas Construcción. Hoja. Techado campamentos temporales Construcción. Estípite. Postes, pisos, cercos (cercados), costillares, caballetes del tejado, de las viviendas.Postes campamentos temporales Comestible. Palmito. El palmito es consumido Utensilios y herr. uso doméstico. Bráctea infrutescencia. Bráctea de la infrutescencia utilizada calentada al fuego como recipiente para almacenar miel,etc Otros usos. Estípite. "pancho" (cuerda) para cargar Otros usos. Hoja. Sustituyendo a la tacuara para asar pescado Otros usos. Estípite. Vaciado, a modo de canaleta para llevar agua Otros usos. Estípite. Cuando tienen engrosamiento se vacian y hacen botes para navegar amarrando dos. Otros usos. Bráctea infrutescencia. Bráctea de la infrutescencia utilizada como corneta cuando alguien se pierde Comercial. Estípite. Se vende para encanchonar Combustible. Estípite. Leña cuando esta seco Cultural. Fruto. Seco como proyectil de "honda" (tirachinas) para cazar pequeños animales. Cultural. Estípite. Astillas para tocar el tambor. Cultural. Raíces adventicias. La gelatina secretada por las raíces en desarrollo es untada en el pene para agrandarlo. Cortada con la luna nueva. (Macía, M.J., Multiplicity in palm uses by the Huaorani of Amazonian Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalFencesStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    ConstructionOtherStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    CulturalRecreationalStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticBractIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsWrappersEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    CulturalRecreationalBractIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    CulturalOtherRootIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    ConstructionTransportationStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingFruitsIndigenousTacanaBolivia
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousTacanaBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción. Tallo. (Galeano, G., Las palmas de la región de Araracuara. 1992)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Construcción. Tallo. Hoja. Techado. Hoja. Carnada. Fruto. (Cerón, C.E., and C. Montalvo, Reserva Biológica Limoncocha. Formaciones vegetales, Diversidad y Etnobotánica.. 2000)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodFish baitFruitsIndigenousAwáEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousAwáEcuador
    ConstructionHousesEntire leafIndigenousAwáEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousAwáEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: El cogollo es comestible, el tronco se usa para construir el piso o poste de la casa, la madera se usa para construir servicios higienicos y cercos, las hojas se usan para hacer techos. El tronco se parte longitudinalmente en tiras y estas se usan como puntal de plátano, como polín para jalar madera y se usan para hacer ganchos para pescar. (Marchan, N., Etnobotánica cuantitativa de una comunidad Chachi de la Provincia de Esmeraldas, Ecuador. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsLabour toolsStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    EnvironmentalFencesStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: El estípite se usa para postes y entablado de viviendas; también se usa en la combustión; es la leña más utilizada; cuando los estípites se quedan sin copa; el ápice del estípite como es hueco ahí anidan las loras habladoras; entonces cuando es época los Cofanes cogen los polluelos para domesticar como mascotas o para comercializar; las hojas secas caen al suelo entonces los pecíolos se pudren ahí crecen unos gusanos (Toin) que son colectados para usar como carnada en la pesca de peces pintadillos (Tesci) en las quebradas. (Cerón, C.E., C.G. Montalvo, J. Umenda et al., Etnobotánica y notas sobre la diversidad vegetal en la comunidad Cofán de Sinangüé, Sucumbíos, Ecuador. 1994)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    OtherN/APetioleIndigenousCofánEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: El palmito de esta palma es consumido y se le conoce como "pushihua yuyu" . Los frutos son consumidos por diversos animales como puerco saino, venado, guatusa y guanta. El tallo es usado para tablas, tiras y pilares en la construcción de casas. La madera de esta palma es tan dura como la chunda (Bactris gasipaes). Las hojas son usadas para tejar techos de casas como se puede observar en la choza del Jardín Etnoforestal. Esta palma es altamente explotada y por eso es escasa en los alrededores de la zona y esta siendo plantada con semillas por los Quichuas de esta comunidad. (Balslev, H., M. Rios, G. Quezada and B. Nantipa, Palmas útiles en la cordillera de los Huacamayos. 1997)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: El piso, las paredes y el techo de las viviendas rurales del Pacífico son construidos con materiales de diferentes especies de palmas. En las tierras bajas, el material más usado para los pisos son los tallos hendidos de la barrigona (Iriartea deltoidea) ; para las paredes se usan los tallos de la zancona o de la memé, igualmente hendidos; el techo se hace comúnmente con las hojas del amargo y el caballete se refuerza con las hojas de la cuchilleja (Geonoma calyptrogynoidea). (Bernal, R., and G. Galeano, Las palmas del andén Pacífico.. 1993)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    CulturalRecreationalStemIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    ConstructionTransportationStemIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: El tronco para "emponados" (entablado) de pisos, paredes, cercos, trochas, graderías; si es de tallo ventricoso, se aprovecha sólo la madera que está por debajo de la dilatación que es más fuerte y duradera. Un tronco alto y de buen diámetro, después de "batido" (cortado en segmentos longitudinales) alcanza a cubrir una superficie de 9 m2 aproximadamente. (Chávez, F., Estudio preliminar de la familia Arecaceae (Palmae) en el Parque Nacional del Manu (Pakitza y Cocha Cashu). 1996)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalFencesStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: El tronco se utiliza para la construcción de artesanías como lanzas, cuchillos, arcos. Se usa el tronco como postes y entablado de las viviendas. Las hojas son usadas en la construcción de techos para las viviendas; esta palma por ser la especie más abundante en el bosque, es la más utilizada. Cuando está tierno el tronco, se utiliza como cuerda para canoas y troncos de árboles de la selva. Se machaca el tronco con un palo y se tuerce para formar una cuerda. Cuando cae la hoja, el pecíolo en descomposición aloja larvas de insectos, las que son recolectadas para uso de carnada en la pesca de peces pequeños en las quebradas del bosque primario. (Cerón, C.E., Etnobiología de los Cofanes de Dureno, provincia de Sucumbíos, Ecuador. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousCofánEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsLabour toolsStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    OtherN/APetioleIndigenousCofánEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Empleada en la construcción de viviendas. (...). Madera para parquet. (Albán, J., La mujer y las plantas útiles silvestres en la comunidad Cocama-Cocamilla de los ríos Samiria y Marañon.. 1994)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousCocamaPeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: En quichua es demoninada cara putu o pushiua y en español pambil; se utiliza el tronco para hacer los pilares de las casas y las hojas para tejer los techos cuando no hay paja toquilla o lisan.(…). Se comen los frutos sin cocinar cuando están tiernos, se puede comer también el palmito. (Ponce, M., Etnobotánica de palmas de Jatun Sacha. 1992)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Estípite. Hojas. Construcción. (Cerón, C.E., Etnobiología de los Cofanes de Dureno, provincia de Sucumbíos, Ecuador. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Finalmente, dos especies reportaron otros tipos de uso diferentes, Iriartea deltoidea (copa) y Attalea phalerata, la primera que ocasionalmente es utilizada como fuente de leña y la segunda que es utilizada como un aditivo importante en la masticación de la hoja de coca. (Paniagua Zambrana, N.Y., Guía de plantas útiles de la comunidad de San José de Uchupiamonas. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    FuelFirewoodStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Floor/Wall. Split trunck. (Kvist, L., M.K. Andersen, J. Stagegaard, M. Hesselsoe, and C. Llapapasca, Extraction from woody plants in flood plain communities in Amazonian Peru: use, choice, evaluation and conservation status of resoruces. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemMestizoN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Floors and walls. (...). Split trunks from the terra firme forest palm Iriartea deltoidea were found in a few flood plain houses, but its use was normally restricted to terra firme communities, where it served as the main resource for flooring. (Stagegaard, J., M. Sørensen, and L.P. Kvist, Estimations of the importance of plant resources extracted by inhabitants of the Peruvian Amazon flood plains. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemMestizoN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesStemMestizoN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Food. Construction. (…). Other construction materials include roof thatch produced from Phytelephas macrocarpa and Scheelea sp. (Palmae) and flooring from Iriartea deltoidea and Socratea exorrhiza (Palmae). (…). These include primarily trees that produce fruits, but also those species from which the larvae of Rhynchophorus palmarum are extracted for consumption: Attalea tesmannii, Jessenia bataua, Iriartea deltoidea (all Palmae), (…). (Pinedo-Vasquez, M., D. Zarin, P. Jipp, et al., Use-Values of Tree Species in a Communal Forest Reserve in Northeast Peru. 1990)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    OtherN/AStemMestizoN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedMestizoN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedMestizoN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Fruits and palm hearts edible. Leaves used to wrap vegetables and meat to be prepared in the fire. Stem used to make floor-platforms and to make blowguns and lances. (Báez, S., and Å. Backevall, Dictionary of plants used by the Shuar of Makuma and Mutints. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsWrappersEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Fruto. Atractivo para presas de caza. Tronco. Combustible. Tronco. Cría de mojojoy. (Cabrera, G., C. Franky, and D. Mahecha, Los nukak: nómadas de la Amazonía colombiana. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousNukakColombia
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousNukakColombia
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousNukakColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Hacer crecer el pene, picadura de tucandera, picadura de burro. (…). Para hacer crecer el pene hay que machucar las raíces que nacen de la base del tronco y dejar remojar en agua. Hay que tomar una sola copa de esta preparación. Hay que cortar el palo cuando el pene ya esté al tamaño requerido para que no siga creciendo. (…). Para aliviar el dolor de la picadura de tucandera hay que machucar un raíz fresca de pachua y cataplasmarla sobre la picadura. Es un buen remedio. (…). El dolor de la picadura de tucandera o de burro se alivia con una cataplasma del palmito raspado de la planta. (Thomas, E. , and I. Vandebroek, Guía de Plantas Medicinales de los Yuracarés y Trinitarios del Territorio Indígena Parque Nacional Isiboro-Sécure, Bolivia. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    CulturalOtherRootIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryPoisoningsPalm heartIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryPoisoningsRootIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Heart (75); fruits (10); larvae (3); house posts (61); thatch (50); hunting gear: blow dart gun (7), bows (2), spear (19); firewood (55); decoration: leaves (3), spears (4), stem (1), carved figures (1), blow dart gun (1), unknown (1); Medicine: heart— purification/purgative (1), malaria (1), bile (1); other: stem—furniture (3), fences (3), flag pole (4), animal pens/stables (2), support for banana plants (1), tiles (1), wood work (1), temp. knife (1); young leaves—broom (1) (Byg, A. and H. Balslev, Factors affecting local knowledge of palms in Nangaritza valley, Southeastern Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemPalm heartNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    EnvironmentalFencesStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire leafNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Medicinal and VeterinaryInfections and infestationsPalm heartNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    OtherN/AStemNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Hull of an "oda you".Trunk. (Gilmore, M.P., W.H. Eshbaugh and A.M. Greenberg, The use, construction, and importance of canoes among the Maijuna of the Peruvian Amazon. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionTransportationStemIndigenousMaijunaPeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav. Español: Pona, Huacrapona. Urarina: Atanaje, Adanaí Usos: Medicinal y cosmético — Las raíces son ocasionalmente utilizadas con fines medicinales contra la hepatitis. Construcción — La madera obtenida del tronco, es utilizada para los pisos y las paredes de las viviendas; menos frecuente es el uso de los troncos para postes (horcones) en las viviendas, las vigas de los techos (rippas) y pisos, y como postes en los campos de cultivo; las hojas son utilizadas para el techado de casuchas temporales. Herramientas y utensilios — Las hojas son empleadas en la fabricación rápida de canastos para el traslado de frutos, o animales muertos cuando acuden al bosque en busca de ellos; ocasionalmente las hojas son utlizadas para secar pescado o como envoltorio para la cocción de otros alimentos; la madera del tronco es utilizada para la fabricación de dardos; ocasionalmente las raíces fúlcreas son cortadas para ser utilizadas como rallador. Decorativo y religioso — Ocasionalmente las hojas son utilizadas con fines decorativos en ceremonias religiosas o eventos festivos. Alimenticio — En muy baja escala los frutos son consumidos y utilizados para la elaboración de bebidas; el palmito es comestible; las larvas que se desarrollan en los troncos caídos son cosechadas y consumidas cocidas. Comunidad:1–10, 12–30. Voucher: H. Balslev 6636. (Balslev, H., C. Grandez, et al., Useful palms (Arecaceae) near Iquitos, Peruvian Amazon. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticRootNot identifiedN/APeru
    OtherN/AStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsWrappersEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    EnvironmentalFencesStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodFruitsNot identifiedN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemRootNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav. Vernacular names: Tepa, tepacawe (adult), pentigui (juvenile plant), tepamo (fruit). Vouchers: Macía et al. #374; Macía et al. #663. Uses. CO: Stems are used for poles in traditional houses. Split stems are used as flexible planks for floors in modern houses. Leaves are used for thatch in the absence of better material. CU: The stem is used to make personal war spears for dances at traditional feasts and rituals. The growing stilt root, penis-shaped, is used for female masturbation. The vernacular name Tepa is used as a woman’s name. E: The endosperm and the palm-heart are edible. The endosperm of germinating seeds is also edible. HF: The stem is used to make blowguns. A long and thin sharp stick from the stem is used to make the central hole in blowguns. O: Larvae of the beetle Rhyncophorus palmarum, living in rotting trunks, are edible. (Macía, M.J., Multiplicity in palm uses by the Huaorani of Amazonian Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    CulturalOtherEntire plantIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    CulturalRitualStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    CulturalOtherRootIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Iriartea deltoidea. Miraña. Construction. Hunting-Fishing. Fuel. Huaorani. Food. Hunting-Fishing. Cultural. Fuel. Bora-Okaina-Huitoto. Food. Animal food. Constructrion. Medicinal. Cultural. Other. Construction. Floor, wall. (Sánchez, M., Use of tropical rain forest biodiversity by indigenous communities in northwestern Amazonia. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousBora-Okaina-HuitotoPeru
    CulturalOtherNot specifiedIndigenousBora-Okaina-HuitotoPeru
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingNot specifiedIndigenousMirañaColombia
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousBora-Okaina-HuitotoPeru
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingNot specifiedIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    OtherN/ANot specifiedIndigenousBora-Okaina-HuitotoPeru
    FuelFirewoodNot specifiedIndigenousMirañaColombia
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousBora-Okaina-HuitotoPeru
    CulturalOtherNot specifiedIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Medicinal and VeterinaryNot specified at allNot specifiedIndigenousBora-Okaina-HuitotoPeru
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousMirañaColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: La hoja del cogollo es comestible. Se hace yaripa, arcos, lanzas y sirve para balsa y canoa desechable y anteriormente se hizo ralladores de yuca ( Manihot esculenta). (Kronik, J. et al., Fééjahisuu. Palmas de los Nietos de la Tierra y Montaña Verde del Centro. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticNot specifiedIndigenousMuinaneColombia
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingNot specifiedIndigenousMuinaneColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousMuinaneColombia
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousMuinaneColombia
    ConstructionTransportationNot specifiedIndigenousMuinaneColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: La yema de las hojas, tambíen llamada guía o palmito, se come cruda o cocida en ensaladas. (…). Los troncos de la Copa se usan como postes en cercos, y para horcones y costillas en las casas. Las hojas son utilizadas en la construcción de los techos (…), frecuentemente se las utiliza en los caballetes de los techos.(…). Ocasionalmente la madera de la Copa es utilizada como leña en la comunidad.(…). Algunos animales de monte, como los monos, consumen los frutos crudos de la Copa. (Paniagua Zambrana, N.Y., Guía de plantas útiles de la comunidad de San José de Uchupiamonas. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuechua/TacanaBolivia
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousQuechua/TacanaBolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuechua/TacanaBolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuechua/TacanaBolivia
    EnvironmentalFencesStemIndigenousQuechua/TacanaBolivia
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousQuechua/TacanaBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Las partes que se utilizan de esta planta son el tronco, las hojas, el palmito, la semilla tierna y la raíz. El tronco es importante para la construcción de casas indígenas tradicionales y como insumo para casas de madera en general ( postes, paredes, pisos), debido a su durabilidad, resistencia y belleza. (…). Semilla tierna. Alimentación. Tronco. Construcción. Muebles, lanzas, cerbatanas y otros artefactos. Materiales y tecnología de construcción. Palmito. Hojas. Techos. (Gomez, D., L. Lebrun, N. Paymal, and A. Soldi, Palmas útiles en la provincia de Pastaza. Amazonia ecuatoriana. Manual práctico. 1996)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    OtherN/ARootIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Leaves used as thatch for roofs of Indian houses ( Scheelea sp., Geonoma spp., Phytelephas microcarpa, Iriartea deltoidea, Socratea exorrhiza, Welfia georgii, Catoblastus aequalis). (…). Stems split open such that the outer fibrous layer of the trunk form a board ( Iriartea deltoidea, Socratea exorrhiza). (…). Palm heart edible ( Prestoea sp., Euterpe spp., Iriartea deltoidea, Socratea exorrhiza, Ammandra sp.). (…). Attraction of game (Bactris gasipaes, Astrocaryum murumuru, Socratea exorrhiza). (Balslev, H., and A. Barfod, Ecuadorean palms- an overview. 1987)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousSionaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousSionaEcuador
    CulturalRecreationalStemIndigenousTsáchilaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los cogollos tiernos (palmito) se usan en la alimentación humana. Los frutos caídos al suelo y germinados comen las personas. En el estípite tumbado al suelo, luego de un mes crecen unas larvas (paca) que son usadas en la alimentación, se cocinan al vapor en las hojas envueltas, bajo la ceniza caliente (año). Los frutos comen los primates como los maquezapas, chorongos, venados, guatines y sajinos. Las hojas se usan para techar las viviendas. El estípite se usa como leña. El estípite se usa para construir lanzas, arpones y pucunas. (Cerón, C.E., and C.G. Montalvo, Etnobotánica de los Huaorani de Quehueiri-Ono, Napo-Ecuador. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los nukak tumban su estípite y lo usan como sustrato para inducir la cría de mojojoy. (Cárdenas, D., and Politis, G.G., Territorio, movilidad, etnobotánica y manejo del bosque de los Nukak Orientales. 2000)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousNukakColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los tallos de esta palma son cortados longitudinalmente en forma de tablillas con los cuales se hacen paredes y pisos de casas. También se los utiliza como tejas para techo cortando secciones cortas y luego dividiéndolas por la mitad. (…). Sus frutos son alimento de tucanes, monos, roedores, venados y chanchos de monte. (Gutiérrez-Vásquez, C.A. and R. Peralta, Palmas comunes de Pando, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los tallos partidos son extremadamente duros y se emplean como material de construcción de viviendas, especialmente para pisos y separaciones de las casas. (Galeano, G., Las palmas de la región de Araracuara. 1992)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los tallos son usados como horcones en casas rústicas, su madera, hecha ripas, es usada como pisos, paredes y las hojas, para techar casas. (Moreno Suárez, L., and O.I. Moreno Suárez, Colecciones de las palmeras de Bolivia. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los troncos son divididos y usados para construcciones rústicas como pisos, postes, paredes, parquet y para utensilios; los troncos enteros como puentes sobre pequeños ríos; porciones de troncos usados para utensilios domésticos; las hojas son utilizada para techado; el palmito es comestible y tiene buen sabor. (Moraes, M., Contribución al estudio del ciclo biológico de la palma Copernicia alba en un área ganadera (Espíritu, Beni, Bolivia). 1991)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionBridgesStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Los vegetales que se emplean en la alimentación, además provienen de la recolección de frutos silvestres durante todo el año; así en los primero meses hasta marzo, se recoge: (…), usahua (fruto de la palmera espinosa), (…), sili-muyu ( palmera), (…). Se pueden encontrar en cualquier época chunta-caspi-muyu, palmitos de chapaja, chambira, ushuahua, ungurahua, patihua, (…), paihua (frutos tiernos o maduros de palmera), (…). Desde mediados y hasta finales de año pueden recolectar: ungurahua-muyu, morete-muyu (…). (…). Entre los artefactos de caza, la bodoquera, elaborada con chonta y cuyaiyura y los dardos de nayoa ( palma similar a la chonta), shiguacara y ungurahua. Ungurahua-muyu. (…). Jessenia bataua. Fruto. Diarrea con sangre. Con los frutos lavados y pelados se hace cocción concentrada. Se toma en ayunas. (Iglesias, G., Sacha Jambi- El uso de las plantas en la medicina tradicional de los Quichuas del Napo. 1989)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Maderas y fibra para construcción. (...). A partir de las hojas y de los troncos de las palmas Oenocarpus bataua, Iriartea deltoidea y Socratea exorrhiza se construyen los techos, pisos y paredes de las casas. (Sánchez, M., and P. Miraña, Utilización de la vegetación arbórea en el Medio Caquetá: 1. El árbol dentro de las unidades de la tierra, un recurso para la comunidad Miraña. 1991)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousMirañaColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousMirañaColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Objetos para actividades agrícolas, caza y pesca. Objetos para almacenar, transportar y procesar alimentos. Atuendos y accesorios corporales. Construcciones. (Cadena-Vargas, C., M. Diazgranados-Cadelo, and H. Bernal-Malagón, Plantas útiles para la elaboración de artesanías de la comunidad indígena Monifue Amena (Amazonas, Colombia). 2007)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    CulturalPersonal adornmentNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    ConstructionOtherNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Palm heart edible. Wood used for house construction, handicraft and as firewood for firing ceramics. Roots used for grating manioc and plantain. (Báez, S., Dictionary of plants used by the Canelos-Quichua. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsOtherStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticRootIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Palm heart, Lances, Handicrafts, Fruits, Houses,Firewood, Construction, Food wrapping Furniture, Preservation (food, beer) Chicken houses, Everything, Fences, Household uses, Floors,Grubs, Blowguns, Parquet, Posts, Banana crops, Hunting, Tomato cages (Anderson, P.J., The social context for harvesting Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae). 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsWrappersNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Human FoodFood additivesNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    FuelFirewoodNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    EnvironmentalFencesNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticNot specifiedIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousNot specifiedEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Palm heart; palm weevils; trunk: keg for mandioc beer. (Shepard, G.H., D.W. Yu, M. Lizarralde, et al., Rain forest habitat classification among the Matsigenka of the Peruvian Amazon. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousMatsigenkaPeru
    OtherN/AStemIndigenousMatsigenkaPeru
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousMatsigenkaPeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Palmito. Walls. Thatching. Arts and crafts. (Moraes, M., J. Sarmiento,and E. Oviedo, Richness and uses in a diverse palm site in Bolivia. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Utensils and ToolsOtherNot specifiedNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Palms with edible palm heart eaten by the Shuar are Astrocaryum urostachys (awant’), Ceroxylon amazonicum (paik’), Iriartea deltoidea (ampakai), Mauritia flexuosa (achu), Oenocarpus bataua (kunkuk’), Oenocarpus mapora (shímpi), Prestoea acuminata (sake), Prestoea schultzeana (tinkimi), Socratea exorrhiza (kupat) and Wettinia maynensis (terén). Oenocarpus bataua is considered to have the tastiest palm heart. Palm heart is eaten raw or prepared in tonga. Tonga are made by wrapping a mixture of fish, meat, vegetables and condiments in large banana, Canna edulis or Renealmia alpinia leaves. The tonga are then roasted in an open fire. (…). The leaves of Oenocarpus mapora, Prestoea schultzeana and Wettinia maynensis are used for thatching roofs. (Van den Eynden, V., E. Cueva, and O. Cabrera, Edible palms of Southern Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalFencesStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Para hacer lanzas, partían un tronco de la palmera pijuayo, (…). Después de hacer la lanza, el Matsés encontraba una bráctea (parte que cubre las flores antes de que florecen) caída de la palmera huacrapona para cubrir la punta de la lanza (para proteger la punta mientras la guardaban). (…). Cuando una mujer quiere ponerse las venas de la hoja de la palma en su nariz, coge la hoja de la palmera pona, separa la vena, y la raspa con su uña. (…). Piso de tambo, juego de muchaco. (Romanoff, S., D. Manquid, F. Shoque, and D.W. Fleck, La vida tradicional de los Matsés. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    CulturalRecreationalNot specifiedIndigenousMatsésPeru
    CulturalPersonal adornmentLeaf rachisIndigenousMatsésPeru
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingBractIndigenousMatsésPeru
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousMatsésPeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Pisos, paredes. (Román, F.J., Especies forestales utilizadas en la construcción de la vivienda tradicional asháninka en el ámbito del Río Perené (Junín, Perú). 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousAsháninkaPeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Se utiliza principalmente en la construcción. (…). El jugo extraído machacando las hojas de pachuviña se añade ocasionalmente al látex antes de ahumarlo. Se supone que favorece la coagulación del látex. (…). Las tablas para el suelo de las casas están hechas de pachuba, asaí, pachuviña y, ocasionalmente, ouricuri donde el asaí escasaea. Estas palmas son conocidas por su resistencia al desgaste y al paso del tiempo, su elasticidad y la facilidad de utilización. La pachuba y la pachuviña son las preferidas para suelos, porque pueden aplanarse a golpes de machete. (Proctor, P., J. Pelham, B. Baum, C. Ely, M.A. Rogríguez-Girones, Expedición de la Universidad de Oxford a Bolivia. Investigación etnobotánica de las Palmae en el noroeste del departamento de Pando. 25 junio-7 de septiembre de 1992. Informe final: Secci...)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    OtherN/AEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Semilla, tallo. (IIAP, Investigación aplicada e implementación de buenas prácticas para el aprovechamiento y transformación sostenible de materias primas vegetales de uso artesanal en los Departamentos de Valle y Chocó. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsOtherSeedsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsOtherStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Silvicultura. Techos/Vigas. Tallo. Doméstico. (Patiño, A., Uso y manejo de la flora entre los Awa de Cuambi-Yaslambi, con énfasis en especies medicinales (Barbacoas, Nariño-Colombia). Estudio etnobotánico.. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousAwáColombia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Some houses have a raised platform made with the sliced or beaten trunk of lriartea deltoidea or Socratea exorrhiza. Walls, partially or totally enclosing the house are also made from the slats of these palms, or Euterpe precatoria. (Alexiades, M.N., Ethnobotany of the Ese Ejja: plants, health, and change in an amazonian society. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousEse EjjaPeru
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousEse EjjaBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Techado. Hoja. Alimento. Fruto. Madera. Tallo. Pucuna. Tallo. (Cerón, C.E., and C. Montalvo, Reserva Biológica Limoncocha. Formaciones vegetales, Diversidad y Etnobotánica.. 2000)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionOtherStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Terminal bud. Floors & walls. Other uses. (…). The young growing tip or "heart" of Euterpe precatoria ("huasai") is a well-liked vegetable. Known as "palmito" or "chonta," palm hearts are eaten raw in salads, or cooked and mashed for use in soups. The delicacy is most frequently consumed during the week before Easter. The palmito of several other palms are also eaten, although they are considered to be of inferior quality. Examples include Bactris gasipaes, Iriartea deltoidea R. and P. (Mejia 0060) or "huacrapona," Astrocaryum chambira, and A. huicungo. (…). The trunk of Oenocarpus mapora is sometimes used as a house post. In the construction of secondary or temporary buildings, the use of the trunks of Jessenia bataua has also been observed. The floors of village houses are commonly made from the beaten trunk of Iriartea deltoidea, Dictyocaryum sp. (Mejia 0065), known locally as "pona colorada" and Socratea exorrhiza (Mart.) Wendl. (Mejia 0121) or "cashapona." (Mejía, K., Las palmeras en los mercados de Iquitos. 1992)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemMestizoN/APeru
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartMestizoN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: The entire leaves of Attalea butyracea are folded or cut longitudinally along the central rachis (figure 8.18E & F). The leaves (entire and folded or leaf-halves) are placed imbricately on the spaced out culms of Gynerium sagittarum, or on the split trunks of Iriartea deltoidea or Socratea exorrhiza that constitute the outer roof construction (shown in figure 8.17). (…). Leaves of Socratea exorrhiza may also be used, but these are said to last only for about one year. (…). Hunting is learned at an early age and children are highly skilled at shooting at “everything that moves”. Nowadays, they develop their shooting skills through practising with purchased catapults, using Socratea exorrhiza and Iriartea deltoidea fruits as ammunition. (…). Bed poles and slats of platform beds are made from Socratea exorrhiza (see also Boom, 1989) or Iriartea deltoidea trunks. (…). Oil extracted from the fruits and/or seeds of Ricinis communis, Jatropha curcas, Attalea phalerata, A. butyracea, Bactris gasipaes and Socratea exorrhiza is occasionally used to fuel oil lamps. (…). Although house posts may be obtained from 27 different tree species, palms are the most frequently used species. In particular, Iriartea deltoidea and Astrocaryum murumuru trunks are most popular, but Socratea exorrhiza, Euterpe precatoria and Jessenia bataua may also be used. (…). Most houses include walls (figures 8.17 and 8.18A) and floors made from slats of Iriartea deltoidea or Socratea exorrhiza. (…). Near the end of 2004, the village of San Antonio was frightened by nocturnal visits of a jaguar, which was on the prawl for domestic fowl. In response, the Yuracaré built a completely closed rectangular trap of about 0.5 x 0.5 x 2 m³ with slats of Socratea exorrhiza, which he divided in two separate compartments by means of wooden stalks (figure 8.22C). In one compartment, he kept domestic fowl for the night, whereas in the other he installed a mechanism that closes the entrance when the prey animal enters the trap. A week later, the jaguar was caught and killed. (…). Benches, chairs and tables are made from the wood of a series of forest trees, but also from slats of Socratea exorrhiza trunks. (Thomas, E., Quantitative Ethnobotanical Research on Knowledge and Use of Plants for Livelihood among Quechua, Yuracaré and Trinitario Communities in the Andes and Amazon Regions of Bolivia.. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    CulturalRitualEntire leafIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticLeaf rachisIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    CulturalRecreationalFruitsIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticPetioleIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: The stem is a very important material for house construction. It is used as poles or split up to form flexible planks for walls and floors. The wood is also used for blowguns, spears (…). Leaves are used for thatch but are inferior to those of other species. The palm heart is edible, and so are the seeds and the immature endosperm. The inside later of the leaf sheath is used with "ireis" to give women strengh to carry on delivery-when a palm leaf fall it makes no noise, therefore hope that the birth is as easy. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousCofánEcuador
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousCofánEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodSeedsIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    CulturalRitualLeaf sheathIndigenousQuichuaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousCofánEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: The stem is split to make walls and floors and also used to make posts and lances. The trunk is dried in the sun after felling the used in house construction, especially for posts. The leaves are used for thatch. The fruit and heart are edible. (Bennett, B.C., M.A. Baker, and P. Gómez-Andrade, Ethnobotany of the Shuar of Eastern Ecuador. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Un objeto que ha sido reemplazado por el plástico: el bañador, antiguamente se hacía con la tola o espata de la inflorescencia de la "tola" Iriartea deltoidea R.&P. Cuando se cae y se la encuentra aún fresca puede doblarse para darle forma rectangular al recipiente. (…). Las boquillas para sostener el cigarrillo se elaboraban antiguamente, con las raíces jóvenes de la tola,(…), para lo que se corta un trozo de casi 10 cm de raíz y se vá afinando con un cuchillo; asimismo debe perforarse en medio para permitir la inhalación del tabaco. (Hinojosa, I., Plantas utilizadas por los Mosetenes de Santa Ana (Alto Beni, Depto. La Paz).. 1991)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticBractIndigenousMoseteneBolivia
    CulturalRecreationalRootIndigenousMoseteneBolivia
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Uso comestible. Meristemo apical. Uso medicinal. Meristemo apical. Uso artesanal. Cerbatanas y lanzas. Leña. Tallo. (Santín Luna, F., Ethnobotany of the Communities of the upper Rio Nangaritza.. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingNot specifiedIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Medicinal and VeterinaryNot specified at allPalm heartIndigenousShuarEcuador
    FuelFirewoodStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Uso Construcción. El estipite se usa para hacer pisos y paredes de las viviendas. (Cerón, C.E., C. Montalvo, A. Calazacón et al., Etnobotánica Tsáchila, Pichincha-Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousTsáchilaEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: UUM´ (Bodoquera). Se obtiene de dos tiras duras de madera (yunkinia) o de palmera (ampakái, kupát, chuchuke, terén). LA CASA. Las hojas se van colocando hasta llegar a 50 cms de la cumbrera. El techo se remata con hojas de ijiu.(…). Como trabajo previo a la construcción de la casa, se procede a reunir el material necesario. Primeramente los cuatro pilares del rectángulo central. En general se tumban árboles de chikainia o paeni. Se usan tambiñen troncos de Tuntuam, ampakai, kuunt. (…). TUNTA-TSENTSAK (Aljaba-flecha). Entre la albaja y el poro se envuelve una tira larga (sapiak) que se obtiene del nervio del cogollo de una palmera (ijiu). Sirve para limpiar la bodoquera. (Bianchi, C., Artesanías y técnicas Shuar. 1982)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionHousesStemIndigenousAchuarEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingLeaf rachisIndigenousShuarEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Walls and floors. (López-Parodi, J., The use of palms and other native plants in non-conventional, low cost rural housing in the Peruvian Amazon. 1988)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedMestizoN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedMestizoN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Walls and floors. (López-Parodi, J., The use of palms and other native plants in non-conventional, low cost rural housing in the Peruvian Amazon. 1988)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedMestizoN/APeru
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedMestizoN/APeru
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: Waoranis use another palm, Iriartea deltoidea, to make blowpipes, which were once an important hunting tool though now they are primarily sold as crafts. (Rodriquez, F., Waorani hunting and harvesting practices in Ecuador. 1996)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Iriartea deltoidea Ruiz & Pav.: We proceeded to the field from Iquitos in pursuit of a palm canoe, accompaines by a team of four local, skilled woodsmen. (Johnson, D., and K. Mejía, The Makin of a Dugout Canoe from the Trunk of the Palm Iriartea deltoidea. 1998)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionTransportationStemNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: De las líneas de la hoja de esta palmera que crece en forma silvestre, los tacana elaboran recipientes de diferentes tamaños. (…). Para la elaboración de cercos , (…), los tacana utilizan los troncos de las palmeras chonta, motacú, copa, assai, majillo, pachiuva, tola y tuana. (…). Para la elaboración de cercos , (…), los tacana utilizan los troncos de las palmeras chonta, motacú, copa, assai, majillo, pachiuva, tola y tuana. (Hissink, K., and A. Hahn, Los Tacana- datos sobre la historia de su civilización. 2000 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea corneto (H.Karst.) H.Wendl.: Esbelta palma abundante en la Región Noroccidental del Ecuador, pero formando asociaciones vive en la sección de Santo Domingo de Quinindé. Esta palma es muy utilizada en las selvas del trópico; sus estipes sirven de material de construcción de las casas rústicas (como pilares o puntales, tablas de piso, paredes, techo, gradas, etc.); se usa igualmente en cercas; sus hojas abanicadas son utilizadas para cubrir las casas (…). (Acosta-Solis, M., Tagua or vegetable ivory - a forest product of Ecuador. 1948 (as Iriartea corneto (H.Karst.) H.Wendl.))
  • Iriartea corneto (H.Karst.) H.Wendl.: Fabricación de cercos, alimentación de animales silvestres. Los tallos partidos son extremadamente duros, sirve para la construcción de casas, pisos, cercos. (García, L.J. , M.J.E. Gómez, S.F.I. Ortiz, and P.J.J. Zuluaga, Principales especies nativas de fauna y flora del Caquetá. Usos actuales y potenciales.. 1996 (as Iriartea corneto (H.Karst.) H.Wendl.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Huacrapona or Iriartea ventricosa (Fig.7) is a tall and robust palm that is an excellent source of flooring. (Jordan, C.B., A study of germination and use in twelve palms of Northeastern Peru. 1970 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: La corteza del estípite. El estípite de la palma se abre y se despulpa; la corteza se pica a la manera de estera y se emplea para fabricar los pisos y las separaciones de la casa. Construcción de vivienda. Animales consumidores: El fruto es consumido por el guaro, el puerco de monte, el cerillo, la boruga y por la danta. (La Rotta, C., P. Miraña,M. Miraña, B. Miraña,M. Miraña, and N. Yucuna, Estudio etnobotánico sobre las especies utilizadas por la comunidad indígena Miraña, Amazonas, Colombia. 1987 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Los materiales más utilizados para las grandes piezas del armazón,(...), son dos especies de palmeras: el tuntuam (Iriartea sp.) y ampaki (Iriartea ventricosa Mart.) y (...). (Descola, P., La selva culta- Simbolismo y praxis en la ecología de los Achuar. 1989 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea corneto (H.Karst.) H.Wendl.: Palma usada como ornamental y que crece en los Llanos orientales en terrenos muy húmedos.(...). Sirve para vigas de casas y cercas, y además los indios del sur hacen con ella unas largas trompetas de sonido bajo y tenue, para sus bailes. (Pérez-Arbeláez, E., Plantas útiles de Colombia. 1956 (as Iriartea corneto (H.Karst.) H.Wendl.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Planta comestible recolectada. Parte comestible, corazón. (Chirif, A., Salud y nutrición en sociedades nativas. 1978 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Por su gran dureza, los estipes son usados en construcciónes. Al igual que los de Dictyocaryum, los estipes de Iriartea ventricosa son usados por los indígenas Emberá para sepultar a los muertos, según información obtenida de los colonos de la región. (Galeano, G., R. Bernal, Palmas del Departamento de Antioquia, Región de Antioquia, Región Occidental. 1987 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Sirve para hacer balsas y obras de menor importancia en las casas. El cogollo de esta palmera también sirve para ensaladas. (Barriga, R., Plantas útiles de la Amazonia Peruana: características, usos y posibilidades.. 1994 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Some trees ares protected for construcion material, especially for house building or canoes, and are almost universally protected when encountered (...), patihua ( Iriartea ventricosa Mart. Palmae) (Irvine, D., Succesion Management and Resource Distribution in an Amazonian Rain Forest. 1989 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Su madera es buena para los postes maestros de las casas, también para "ripas" o listones para paredes. Es utilizada para "parket". Sirve para fabricar lanzas, aunque no tan buenas como las de Uyéi o pijuallo. La base del peciolo foliar lo emplean las mujeres para recoger la basura al barrer. La espata seca la empleaban antiguamente como bocina de aviso. (Guallart, J.M., Nomenclatura Jibaro-Aguaruna de Palmeras en el Distrito de Cenepa.. 1968 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: Su tronco duro con porción abultada en la parte medio superior. Su tronco duro y negro, se usa en láminas para hacer pisos y paredes de las casas, durando mucho tiempo. Es palmera de gran importancia económica pues de ella se obtiene madera para parquet, que en el comercio se conoce como "parquet chonta". (Mejía, K.M., Palmeras y el selvícola amazónico. 1983 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))
  • Iriartea ventricosa Mart.: The hard, black wood is removed from the trunk in sheets and is a preferred flooring and shelving material. Also used as rafters and support beams. Harpoon staves, arrow points, and roofing ridege pins. Temporary canoes may be made from swollen trunk sections. (Bodley, J.H., and F.C. Benson, Cultural ecology of Amazonian palms. 1979 (as Iriartea ventricosa Mart.))

Bibliography

A. Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador
B. World Checklist of Arecaceae
C. Henderson, A. 1990. Introduction and the Iriarteinae. Flora Neotropica Monograph 53.