Euterpe precatoria var. precatoria

Primary tabs

Error message

  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 348 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value-suffix' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 348 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 348 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: Illegal string offset '#value-suffix' in compare_description_element_render_arrays() (line 348 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
  • Warning: usort(): Array was modified by the user comparison function in compose_feature_block_wrap_elements() (line 1223 of /var/www/drupal-7.32/sites/_dataportal-production/modules/cdm_dataportal/includes/descriptions.inc).
no image available

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Bolivia present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Brazil North present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Colombia present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Ecuador present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
French Guiana present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Guyana present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Peru present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Suriname present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Trinidad-Tobago present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Venezuela present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)C
Colombia (Amazonas, Caquetá, Guainía, Guaviare, Meta, Norte de Santander, Putumayo, Vaupés, Vichada), Venezuela (Amazonas, Anzoátegui, Apure, Bolívar, Monagas), Trinidad , the Guianas, Ecuador (Morona-Santiago, Napo), Peru (Amazonas, Cuzeo, Loreto, Madre de Dios, Pasco, San Martín), Brazil (Acre, Amazonas, Pará, Rondônia), and Bolivia (Beni, Pando, Santa Cruz); lowland rain forest, commonly along rivers in periodically inundated areas, below 350 m, occasionally reaching 600 m in the Andes and Guayana Highland. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Low elevations in the Amazon region.
Distribution in Ecuador. Plants from the E lowlands of Ecuador belong to this variety. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A

Discussion

  • The type of Euterpe confertiflora is sterile, but the leaves seem to belong to E. precatoria. Bailey, however, described the fruits (which we have not located) as having ruminate endosperm. The types of Euterpe langloisii and Euterpe petiolata (both formerly at B) have not been located, and are presumed destroyed. These names are interpreted from Burret's descriptions, and from more-recent collections from the type localities. There is little doubt as to their status as synonyms. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Common Name

  • Bolivia: panabí (Chácobo); Brazil: acaí, acaí da mata, assaí da mata, jucara; Colombia: asaí, guasai , guypani, ma-na-cáy (Guahibo), manaca, maizpépe, ne-e-da (Huitoto); Ecuador: ini-bue (Siona), palmito, pamiwa, sadke (Shuar), sake (Shuar); Guayana: manicole, rayhoo, wabo-yaka (Wapisiana); Peru: huasai, tunci sake; Suriname: nomkie muruku pina, prasara; Venezuela: ankú (Panare), arimkwe, caruto, guajo (Yekuana), manaca, mapora, nenea, paimito manaca; Trinidad: manac. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Uses

  • Though it is a useful palm throughout its range, Euterpe precatoria var. precatoria is not used as much as either E. edulis or E. oleracea. The fruits are collected and used to make a drink, The stems are commonly used in house construction. The roots are used medicinally for muscle aches and snake bites, and a decoction from the roots is taken (Tukana, Colombia) for malaria (Glenboski C-131). A decoction from the leaves is used to alleviate chest pains (Chácobo, Bolivia). The leaves are used to make brooms and as a source of temporary thatching. In Amazonian Venezuela, the peduncular bract is used to roll cigar tobacco (Zent, label data). (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Description

  • Stem tall, solitary. Leaf rachis with few scales; pinnae strongly pendulous, 1-2 cm wide, with 1 major lateral vein on each side of the mid-rib. Low elevations in the Amazon region. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)A
  • Stems solitary.
    Leaves 10-20; sheath 0.7-1.6 m long; petiole (0-)18-57 cm long; rachis 2.1-3.6 m long; pinnae (43)48-91 per side, with a prominent midvein; basal pinna 60-70 x 0.2-0.5 cm; middle pillnae 62-88 x 1-2 cm; apical pinna 36-44 x 0.5 cm.
    Inflorescences infrafoliar; peduncle 10-15 cm long; prophyll 70-85 cm long; peduncular bract 55-70 cm; rachis 30-94 cm long; rachillae 70-200, basal raehillae 55-80 cm long, apical ones to 35 cm long, 4-5 mm diam. at anthesis, 5-6 mm diam. In fruit, densely covered with 0.1-0.5 mm long, whitish, much branched, flexuous hairs; staminate sepals densely pilose abaxially, drying white; pistillate sepals densely pilose abaxially, drying white.
    Fruits globose, 1- 1.3 .m diam. (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Materials Examined

  • COLOMBIA. AMAZONAS: Río Apaporis, Río Kananarí, Pacoa, 250 m, 1- 15 Dec 1951, García-Barriga 14008 (ECON); Río Loreto-Yacu, 7 Nov 1972, Glenboski C-131 (COL); Río Caquetá, Araracuara, 10-22 Nov 1982, Idrobo et al. 11301 (COL); Caño Aduche, 3 Mar 1982, La Rotta 133 (COL); Río Apaporis, Soratama, 7 Dec 1951. Schultes & Cabrera 14865 (ECON); Rio Apaporis, 00°05'N, 70°40'W, 21 Jan 1952, Schultes & Cabrera 14934a (COL, US); Río Karaparaná, between the mouth and El Encanto, 150 m, 22- 28 May 1942, Schultes 3828 (GH).
    META: Río Quenane, 22- 23 Feb 1941, Dugand & Jaramillo 2898 (COL); Sierra La Macarena, Río Duda, 450 m. Idrobo 8370 (COL); between Villavicencio and Río Guayuriba, 400 m. 8-9 Nov 1941, R. Jaramillo 181 (COL); 20 km E of Villavicencio, 17 Mar 1939. Killip 34267 (A. COL, US); La Macarena, Río Guayabero, Caño Cabra, 7 Dec 1967, Klein 8 (COL); Puerto López. Río Meta, 3 Aug 1944, Little 8414 (COL, US); Villavicencio, 300 m. Jan 1836, Triana 1727- 2 (COL).
    NORTE DE SANTANDER: Petrolea, beginning of pipeline, 60 m, 29 Sep 1946. M. Foster 1795 (GH).
    PUTUMAYO: Puerto Ospina, Río Putumayo, 230 m, 14 Nov 1940, Cuatrecasas 10580 (COL).
    VAUPES: Mitú, 20 Oct 1939, Cuatrecasas 7298 (US); Río Kubiyu. 13 Jul 1976, Zarucchi et al. 1839 (NY); trail from Río Vaupés to Sta Lucia on Río Querari, 9 Aug 1976, Zarucchi et al. 1886 (NY).
    VICHADA: Gaviotas. 5 Jul 1978. Balick & Vargas, 1193 (COL, NY); Brazo Amanavén, 280 m, 17 Jul 1977, Pabón et al. 128 (COL); Tuparro, 23 Feb 1979. Vincelli 1028 (COL); 13 May 1979. Vincelli 1143 (COL)
    VENEZUELA. AMAZONAS: Depto. Atures, foot of Serranía San Borja, 06°05'N, 67°23'W. 24 Jan 1989, Cuello 572 (NY); Dept. Atabapo, Cucurital de Yagua, 03°36'N, 66°34'W, 120 m. 8 May 1979. Davidse et al. 17455 (MO); Dpto. Atabapo, Macabana, Río Ventuari, 04°15'N, 66°20'W. 140 m, Sep 1980, Delgado 665 (NY); Dpto. Alabapo, Río Ocamo, Cerro Mawedi, O2°58'N, 64°14'W, 200 m , Feb 1990, A. Fernández 7010 (NY); Dpto. Río Negro, Neblina Base Camp, Rio Baria. 00°50'N, 66°10'W, 6 Feb 1984, Henderson 14 (NY); Dpto. Río Negro, middle part of Rio Baria, 01°10?'N, 66°25'W. 1 Jul 1984. Miller & Davidse 1653 (NY); 1 km NE of Base Camp on N side of íoO Baria. 00°50'N, 66°09'W, 18 Feb 1985, Nee 30947 (MG. NY); Dpto. Atures, 1 km N of Río Cataniapo, 45 km SE of Puerto Ayacucho, 05°35'N, 67°15'W, 200-300 m, 11 May 1980, Steyermark et al. 122278 (MO. NY); Rio Cuno, 05°25'N, 66°55'W, 300-350 m, 24 May 1986, Zent 0985-02b (NY); San Pedro Cataniapo, 05°35'5. 67°20'W, 100-150 m. 27 Aug 1986, Zent 0985-02c (NY).
    ANZOATEGUI: EI Tigrito. 10 Jun 1942, Pittier 15142 (US).
    APURE: 25 km WNW or Buena Vista, 06°13'N, 68°49'W, 70 m, 16-18 Feb 1978, Davidse & González 14181 (MO); Dist. Pedro Camejo, 16 km NW of Mala de Guanábana, 75 m, 27 Feb 1979, Davidse & González 15878 (MO); Dist. Pedro Camejo, 06°42;N, 67°48'W, 70 m. 2 Mar 1979. Davidse & González 15986 (MO).
    BOLIVAR: Mpio. Raúl Leoni , 3 km N of Cerro Camarón, 42.5 km SE of Entre Rios, 05°43'N, 64°07'W, 240 m. 1 Nov 1988, Aymard & A. Fernández 7230 (NY); Río Chirea, 450 m, 8 Aug 1953, Bernardi 753 (NY); Dist Cedeño, vic. of Corozal, 6 km from Maniapure toward Caicara, 06°55'N, 66°30'W, 400 m, 25 May 1986, Boom & Wentzel 6720 (NY); Hato La Vergarena, 3 km E of Río Aro, 06°50'N, 63°52'W, 330 m, Mar 1987, A. Fernández 4110 (NY); Dist. Piar, SW base of Amaruay-tepuí, W of Aparamán-tepui, 05°55'N, 62°15'W, 500-600 m, 25 Apr 1986, Holst &. Liesner 2710 (NY); 2-8 km S of Salta Para, 06°13'N, 64°28'W, 220-240 m, 10 May 1982, Morillo & Liesner 9079 (MO); Chimamtá, NW slopes of Abácapa-tepuá on Ráo Abácapa, 420 m, 30-31 Mar 1953, Steyermark 74791 (NY); 5 km from Hato de Nuria, E of Miamo, Altiplanicie de Nuria, 400 m, 12 Jan 1961, Steyermark 88408 (NY, US).
    MONAGAS: Reserva florestal de Guarapiche, nr. Confluence of Río Guarapiche with Caño Colorado, 09°54'N, 62°541W, 23 May 1967, Wessels Boer 1814 (NY).
    TRINIDAD. Aripo Savanna, 5 Mar 1920, Broadway 8958 (TRIN); Tamana Forest, 17 Feb 1920, Broadway 9750 (TRIN); Northern Range. Blanchisseuse rd., Textel Sta., 600 m, 15 Aug 1991, Henderson & Coelho 1621 (NY, US); 51. Andrew Co., E Main Rd., 1.3 km NW of jct. with Turure Rd., Long Stretch Forest Reserve, 10°36'N, 61°10'W, 6 Sep 1985, Sanders & Budhoo 1751 (TRIN); 51. Patrick Co., Chatam Rd. North, ca. 300 m S of lrois Bay, 10°08'N, 61°45'W, 9 Sep 1985, Sanders & Budhoo 1758 (TRIN); Aripo Mountains, 19 Aug 1963, Wessels Boer 1638 (NY).
    GUYANA. Baramanni Creek, Waini River, 2 Mar 1945, Forest Department of British Guiana F2349 (NY); Rupununi Dist., Kuyuwini Landing, Kuyuwini River, 02°10'N, 59°15'W, 200 m, 5 Feb 1991, Jansen-Jacobs et al. 2391 (NY); without localily. Oct 1899, Jenman 7575 (NY).
    SURINAME. Stondasi, 8 Dec 1962, Wessels Boer 329 (NY); Kabalebo, 5 Jan 1963, Wessels Boer 571 (NY).
    ECUADOR. MORONA SANTIAGO: Pampants, Río Cangaime, 02°47'5, 77°36'W, 300 m, 22 Aug 1985, Juwa 52 (NY); nr. Taisha, 300 m, 14 Aug 1985, Mashu 25 (NY).
    NAPO: 2 km from Coca on Río Payamino, 00°20'S, 77°10'W, 3 Sep 1986, Argüello & Neil 661 (NY); W side or Laguna Canagucno, 00°02'S, 76°13'W, 230 m, 21 May 1983, Balsley 4311 (AAU, NY, QCA); 47 km 5 or Coca, ca 00°45'5, 76°53'W, 300 m, 17 Jun 1983, Balslev & Brako 4317 (AAU, NY, QCA); Comuna San José de Payamino al Rio Payamino,00°33'S, 77°18'W,300 m, 1- 7 Dec 1983, Balslev & Irvine 4636 (AAV, NY); ½ hr. downstream on Río Cuyabeno from Laguna Grande, 00°02'S, 76°11'W, 300 m, 20-26 Jan 1984, Balslev 4813 (AAU, NY, QCA); 19 Apr 1988. Balslev 69047 (AAU, NY); Añangu, S bank or Río Napo, 95 km from Coca, 00°31'S, 76°23'W, 260-350 m, 19 Jun 1985, Balslev 60615 (AAU, NY); 30 May- 21 Jun 1982, SEF 9261 (NY); Canlón Lago Agrio, Dureno, 00°02'S, 76°42'W, 350 m. 8 Aug 1986. Cerón 322 (AAU, NY); Parque Nacional Yasuní, 00°52'S, 76°05'W, 230 m, 16-19 Jan 1988, Cerón 3401 (AAU); Rio Lagarto Cocha, 00°33'5, 75°13'W, 190 m, 16-17 Jun 1983, Lawesson et al. 44473 (AAU, QCA); Dureno on Río Aguarico, 21 Oct 1966, Pinkley 536 (NY).
    PERU. CUZCO: Rd. to Puerto Maldonado-Urcos, 10 km after Quinze Mil, 5 OCI 1987, Kahn & Llosa 2230 (NY).
    LORETO: Maynas, Río Napo, Quebrada Sucusari, 140 m, 8 Nov 1979, Gentry et al. 27697 (MO); Iquitos, Puerto Almendras, 04°55'S, 73°45'W, 28 Jun 1989, Shanley & Ruiz 5 (NY); Prov. Maynas, Cahuide (Río Itaya), 10 Oct 1984, Vásquez & Jaramillo 5696 (NY); Mariscal Castilla, Caballo Cocha, 03°55'5, 70°30'W, 106 m, 12 Jul 1987, Vásquez & Jaramillo 9246 (NY); Prov. Maynas. Allpahuayo, Nov 1990, Vásquez et al. 14828 (NY).
    MADRE DE DiOS: Prov. Manú, Parque Nacional del Manú, Río Manú, Cocha Cashu Field Sta.,11 °50'S, 71°25'W, 350 m, 29 Jul 1984, R. Foster 9733 (NY).
    PASCO: Oxapampa. Palcazu Valley, Cabeza de Mono, 5-6 km W of Iscosazin, 10°12'S, 75°14'W, 325 m, 13-19 Apr 1983, D. Smith 3800 (NY).
    SAN MARTiN: 20 km from Uchiza, 350 m, 15 Dec 1985, Kahn 1852 (NY).
    BRAZIL. ACRE: Mpio. Mancio Lima, Rio Moa, Fazenda Arizona, 07°25'S, 73°33'W, 15 Oct 1989, Henderson et al. 1135 (NY); Mpio. Mancio Lima. ca. 5 km W of Mancio Lima, 07°40'S, 72°55'W, 17 Feb 1992, Henderson et al. Oct 1989, Pinard & Barros 849 (NY).
    AMAZONAS: Rio Wiahanahu, Rio Demini basin, 23 Aug 1975, Anderson 199 (INPA); Manaus, Reserva Ducke, 6 Apr 1967, Byron & Elias 67-17 (INPA, NY); Mpio. Careiro, Manaus-Porto Velho rd., km 22, then 2 km on rd. to Purupuru, 03°30?S, 60°W, 1 Apr 1985, Henderson & Lima 177 (INPA, NY); Mpio. Humaitá, BR 230, km 140, ca. 07°58'S, 62°02'W, 16 Apr 1985, Henderson et al. 253 (INPA, NY); 5 km N of Manaus on rd. to Caracarai, 1 Aug 1986, Henderson & da Silva 637 (NY); Mpio. Benjamin Constant, Rio Javari between Benjamin Constant and Atalaia do Norte, 04°20'5. 70°20'W, 75 m, 3 Jan 1989, Henderson et al. 817(NY); BDFF Reserve Km 41, 64 km N of Manaus on BR 174 and then 41 km E on ZF 3, 11 Sep 1989. Henderson et al. 1072 (NY); Reserva Ducke. nr. Manaus on rd. to Itacoatiara, 24 Oct 1989, Henderson & Scariot 1168 (NY); Mpio. Maraã, left bank of Rio Japura, Canta Galo, 9 Jan 1991 , Henderson et al. 1530 (NY); Manaus-Caracaraí, km 31 , 23 Aug 1973, Lisbóa 16 (INPA); km 8 on Manaus-Itacoatiara rd., 5 Feb 1977, Monteiro 1360 (INPA); Colonia Santo Antonio, km 7 on Manaus-Itacoatiara rd., 16 Mar 1967, Moore et al. 9539 (INPA, NY); Fazenda Esteio, ZF 3, Distrito Agropecuáuio da Suframa, Nov 1979, Rankin et al. 85 (INPA); Manaus-Itacoatiara rd., km 66. 29 Nov 1968, Rodrigues et al. 8464 (INPA, NY).
    MATO GROSSO: Aripuaná, 09°10'S, 60°40'W, 17 Mar 1977, Anderson 284 (INPA); 1 Oct 1975, Lisbôa et al. 573 (INPA); Rio Machado, Dec 1931, Krukoff 1604 (F).
    PARA: Rio Jamundá, Beira, nr. Paranapitinga Falls, 18 May 1911, Ducke 11776 (MG); Mpio. Itaituba, Santarém-Cuiabá rd., BR 163, km 1227, 05°55'S, 55°40'W, 19 May 1983, Silva 357 (INPA).
    RONDONIA: Guajara- Mirim, Rio Pacaás Novos, 13 Aug 1976, Cavalcante 3280 (MG); Rio Machado, Caruru, n.d., Goulding 35 (INPA); Presidente Medici, Rodovia 429, km 15, 27 Aug 1984, Maciel et al. 1387 (MG); Mpio. Ariquemes, 21 km SE of Ariquemes on BR 364 then 1 km E on Linea 45, 10°07'S, 62°56'W, 200 m, 17 Mar 1987, Nee 34420 (NY); Mpio. Costa Marques, 2 km W of Rio Cautarinho on BR 429, 12°04'S, 63°28'W, 200 m, 24 Mar 1987, Nee 34482 (NY); Mpio. Guajara Mirim, 6 km NE of Guajara Mirim, 10°41'S, 65°15'W, 175 m, 9 Apr 1987, Nee 34691 (NY); Mpio. Porto Velho, on BR 364, 38 km ENE of jct. with BR 325, 40 km E of Abuna, 18 km ENE of Corrego Raiz, 09°40'S, 65°00'W, 140 m, 16 Apr 1987, Nee 34877 (NY); Mpio. Guajara Mirim, BR 364, 140 km before Guajara Mirim, 09°20'S, 65°W, 17 Dec 1988, Scariot et al. 245 (NY); Mpio. Porto Velho, Usina Hidroelectrica Samuel, 50 km SE of dam, 09°06'S, 63°13'W, 12- 24 Sep 1988, Thomas et al. 6210 (NY); 12-24 Sep 1988, Thomas et al. 6471 (NY); 12-24 Sep 1988, Thomas et al. 6498 (NY).
    BOLIVIA. BEN): Provo Vaca Díez. vic. of Alto Ivón, 11°45'S, 66°02'W, 200 m, 12 Dec 1983, Boom 4151 (NY); Provo Ballivía, km 38 on Yucumo- Rurrenabaque rd., 14°50'S, 67°05'W, 220 m, 7-14 Apr 1989, D. Smith et al. 12921 (NY).
    LA PAZ: Alto Madidi, 13°35'S, 68°46'W, 280 m, 24 May 1990, Gentry & Estensoro 70504 (NY).
    PANDO: Nicolás Suárez, in the zone of Nareuda, Campoana, San José, 290 m, 13 Jan 1983, Casas 8212 (NY); Los Huérfanos, 11 °20'S, 69°15'W, 275 m, 10 Jul 1992, Ely 1 (NY); Puerto Oso, 11°24'S, 69°04'W, 240 m, 10 Aug 1992, Ely 48 (NY); Prov. Manuripi, along Río Madre de Dios. 1 km W of Humaita, 12°01'S, 68°16'W, 28Aug 1985, Nee 31632 (NY).
    SANTA CRUZ: Prov. Guarayos, 2 km NW of Perserverancia, 14°43'S, 62°49'W, 275 m, 16 Sep 1990, Nee 38806 (NY). (Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72)B

Use Record

  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Como planta ornamental. Las hojas tiernas son comestibles. (Vásquez, M., and J. B. Vásquez, La extraccíon de productos forestales diferentes de la madera en el ambito de Iquitos-Perú. 1998 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantNot identifiedN/APeru
    EnvironmentalOrnamentalEntire plantNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodBeveragesPalm heartNot identifiedN/APeru
    Human FoodBeveragesPalm heartNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Con los frutos de las especies de Euterpe (naidí) y Oenocarpus (milpesos) se preparan bebidas nutritivas y deliciosas. (…). Una bebida similar a la del milpesos se extrae de los frutos del naidí, amasándolos en agua. Aunque, al igual que con el milpesos, la explotación se hace principalmente a nivel doméstico, los frutos del naidí se venden en el mercado de algunas poblaciones, como en Buenaventura. (…). Desafortunadamente, la explotación no siempre se hace de modo racional, ni beneficia a las comunidades locales. El ejemplo dramático de esto es la explotación del palmito. Las poblaciones de naidí, que cubren miles de hectáreas al sur de la costa colombiana del Pacífico, han sido dadas en concesión a las empresas enlatadoras de palmito, que explotan las palmas silvestres mediante el trabajo de los dueños ancestrales del bosque, sin que a estos les quede una ganancia que les ayude a mejorar sus condiciones de vida. Así el nativo, por obtener el mayor beneficio posible, hace una explotación destructiva de un recurso que podría ser manejado de modo racional, y de esta manera los naidizales son arrasados. (Bernal, R., and G. Galeano, Las palmas del andén Pacífico.. 1993 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousNot specifiedColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: De esta palma se extrae el "palmito" que es una importante fuente de alimento. De los frutos se prepara el jugo de "asaí". (...). Los botones florales se utilizan en la elaboración de encurtidos. (Gutiérrez-Vásquez, C.A. and R. Peralta, Palmas comunes de Pando, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 2001 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFood additivesFlowerNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodFood additivesFlowerNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Descensos azúcar en la sangre. "Huasaí" (raíz).(…). 250g de raíces cocidas en 2 litros de agua.(…). Mal de hígado. "Huasai" (raíz). (…). Preparado para curar el SIDA. "Huasai", raíz y (…). (…). Tratamiento del cáncer. 6 raíces de "Huasai" y 3 gotas de "Sangre de grado", cocidos en un litro de agua. (…). 1/4 kg de raíces cocidos en 4 litros de agua.(…). (Silva, H., and J. García, La Medicina Tradicional en Loreto. 1997 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Medicinal and VeterinaryEndocrine systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryInfections and infestationsRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryEndocrine systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryOtherRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryOtherRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryInfections and infestationsRootMestizoN/APeru
    Medicinal and VeterinaryDigestive systemRootMestizoN/APeru
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: El cogollo de la copa, (…), forma un palmito de óptima calidad, muy requerido por la industria, exportándose (…). (…). Los residuos que quedan después de la extracción del palmito se utilizan en la alimentación de bovinos y porcinos y fermentado contituye un buen abono orgánico para hortalizas y frutales. (…). El tronco seco se emplea en construcciones rústicas y para leña. Las hojas verdes sirven para raciones del ganado y secas para coberturas de techos y paredes en construcción de uso transitoria. Las hojas trituradas, proveen de materia prima para la fabricación de papel. (…). El carozo (endocarpio y almendra), después de us descomposición se emplea como materia orgánica para cultivos hortícolas y ornamentales. La palmera entera es usada en las fiestas regionales de carnavales y San Juan, para lo cual la adornan con serpentina, regalos, etc., constituyendo la tradicional Humisha. (Barriga, R., Plantas útiles de la Amazonia Peruana: características, usos y posibilidades.. 1994 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: El estipe se usa como pilote de las casas (palafitos). Los frutos maduros al caer al suelo sirven de cebo para algunos animales silvestres que cazan las comunidades para completar su alimentación. Los frutos los consumo el conejo (Agouti paca) y la tatabra ( Tayassu tajacu). Las hojas se usan para elaborar canastos, en los cuales se guardan los cangrejos comestibles (Cardiosoma crassum) capturados en el manglar con le fin de transportarlos a la casa o a los sitios de venta. Además, la estipe de esta palma se machaca y se usa como cuerda de amarre para transportar las trozas de madera por el río. De los frutos maduros se obtiene un delicioso refresco por disolución del pericarpo en agua tibia. También la yema terminal de la palma se consume como palmito. (Caballero, M.R., La etnobotánica en las comunidades negras e indígenas del delta del Río Patía. 1995 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsRopeStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: El fruto y el cogollo son comestibles, las hojas se usan para construir techos de casa de montaña, el tronco se usa como polín para jalar madera y como puntal de plátano, el fruto es alimento de aves (pava y paletón o tucán) (Marchan, N., Etnobotánica cuantitativa de una comunidad Chachi de la Provincia de Esmeraldas, Ecuador. 2001 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsLabour toolsStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Animal FoodWildlife attractantFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Human FoodFoodFruitsIndigenousCayapaEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsLabour toolsStemIndigenousCayapaEcuador
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Form the basis of significant industries: Euterpe oleracea (palm hearts), Leopoldinia piassaba (piasava fiber or chiquichiqui), and Phytelephas macrocarpa spp. Schottii (taguar or vegetable ivory). (…). Fruits from the naidí (Euterpe oleracea) are sold in the market of Buenaventura, and are used to make a juice. (Bernal, R., Demography of the Vegetable Ivory Palm Phytelephas seemannii in Colombia, and the Impact of Seed Harvesting. 1998 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Fruits are edible and used for juice and ice cream. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsNot identifiedN/AEcuador
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Frutos, cogollos. Chivé, mingao, palmito. (Vargas, G., TRANSFORMACIÓN Y ELABORACIÓN DE ALIMENTOS CON ESPECIES VEGETALES Y ANIMALES POR LAS COMUNIDADES CUBEAS DEL CUDUYARI. 2006 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsIndigenousCubeoColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartIndigenousCubeoColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Los frutos de la palma se recolectan para la elaboración de dulces, jugos y, cuando las condiciones urbanas lo permiten, de helados. El dulce de naidí, al igual que el de otras palmas como la de chapil (Oenocarpus mapora) o el milpesos (Oenocarpus bataua), se denomina pepiao. Su preparación consiste en cocinar por unos minutos las frutas (…). (…). El jugo implica el mismo proceso, (…). (…). Tanto el jugo como el pepiao de naidí se consideran, además de particularmente deliciosos, bueno pa´ la sangre, lo cual quiere decir que no sólo alimentan sino que también proveen de fuerza física y potencia sexual. En este sentido, (…), se clasifican dentro de los alimentos fríos, por lo cual son prohibidos para las mujeres recién paridas y menstruantes porque les produce una enfermedad denominada pasmo. (…). No es extraño observar algunas palmas alrededor o detrás de las casas de los ríos o, aun, de las de pequeños centros urbanos. (…). En efecto, en centros urbanos como Guapí, Tumaco o Bocas de Satinga, se puede observar en épocas de cosecha a mujeres o a niños con canastos ofreciendo frutas de naidí en los mercados o calles. (…). Para la alimentación, además de los frutos, se ha usado el cogollo, también denominado palmicha. (…). En la construcción de casa y rancho también ha sido utilizado el naidí. Los pisos y techos de las viviendas tradicionalmente se hacían de palma zancona, (Socratea exorrhiza) los primeros; y de las hojas de diferentes especies como chalar (Socratea exorrhiza, Pholidostachis dactiloides) y quitasol ( Mauritiela macroclada), lo segundos. El naidí ha sido utilizado para techar casas y rachos (…). (…). En la cosntrucción de las azoteas de las cocinas se usa, además de la guadua, el estipe de naidí. (…). Los tuqueros utilizan también estipes de naidí, (…), para construir en el monte la infraestructira que les permite extraer las trozas de madera. (…). El palmo extraído del cogollo de naidí es cortado y traído del monte (…) para venderlo a las empresas. (Restrepo, E., El naidí entre los "grupos negros" del Pacífico Sur colombiano. 1996 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionOtherStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryReproductive system and sexual healthFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryBlood and cardiovascular systemFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionOtherStemNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryBlood and cardiovascular systemFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodPalm heartNot identifiedN/AColombia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
    Human FoodBeveragesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Medicinal and VeterinaryReproductive system and sexual healthFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFoodFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    ConstructionHousesStemAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
    Human FoodFood additivesFruitsAfro-AmericanoN/AColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: Planta silvestre comestible. (Triana, G., Los Puinaves del Inirida. Formas de subsistencia y mecanismos de adaptación.. 1985 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousPuinaveColombia
    Human FoodFoodNot specifiedIndigenousPuinaveColombia
  • Euterpe oleracea Engel: The assaí or guasaí, Euterpe oleracea and E. precatoria, represents palms dear to the heart of all Amazonian people. A flavorful brownish drink is prepared from the bluish-black fruits, (…). This drink is oftentimes allowed to ferment to provide Indians with a chicha. (…). According to the Witoto and Bora Indians on the Igaraparaná River, assaí, known as milpesillos by Colombians, was the gift of the spirit or god of rain, for which reason it is taken as a drink in ceremonies celebrated during the rainy season. There are many intrecate associations of the palm with the Witoto spirit world, (…). (Schultes, R.E., Palms and religion in the Northwest Amazon. 1974 (as Euterpe oleracea Engel))

Bibliography

    A. Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador
    B. Gloria Galeano & A. Henderson, Flora Neotropica Monograph 72
    C. World Checklist of Arecaceae