Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth, Enum. Pl. 3: 231 (1841)

Primary tabs

http://media.e-taxonomy.eu/palmae/photos/palm_tc_89348_1.jpg

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Belizepresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Boliviapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Brazil Northpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Colombiapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Costa Ricapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Ecuadorpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
French Guianapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Guatemalapresent (Henderson, A.J. (2011) A revision of Geonoma. Phytotaxa 17: 1-271.)B
Guyanapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Panamápresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Perupresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Surinamepresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A
Venezuelapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)A

Discussion

  • Taxonomic notes: - Geonoma deversa is the most wide-ranging species in the genus, occurring from Belize and Guatemala to Brazil and Bolivia. It is variable, but not as much as it's wide range would suggest (see section on Infraspecific Variation). Its treatment here is generally consistent with that of Wessels Boer (1968), except that several subspecies are recognized. It is recognized by its flower pits which are usually tricussately arranged (sometimes quadricussately) and closely spaced throughout the rachillae.

    Subspecific variation: - Three traits (stem branching, stem type, leaf division) vary within this species. Only two specimens (of 179) are scored as stems not cane-like and this trait, together with stem branching and leaf division, are not useful for subspecific delimitation in this species. There is little geographic discontinuity, except that in Central America two subgroups are geographically isolated?in Belize and Guatemala, and the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Specimens from Belize and Guatemala differ significantly from other Central American (excluding Osa Peninsula subgroup) specimens in 14 variables (stem diameter, internode length, sheath length, petiole length, rachis width, basal pinna length, basal pinna width, basal pinna angle, apical pinna length, apical pinna width, prophyll length, peduncular bract length, peduncle width, number of rachillae)(t-test, P <0.05); and specimens from the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica differ from other Central American (excluding Belize and Guatemala) specimens in 12 variables (stem diameter, sheath length, rachis length, rachis width, number of pinnae, apical pinna length, apical pinna width, prophyll length, peduncle width, rachillae length, number of rachillae, fruit length). Based on these results, these two subgroups are recognized as subspecies (subspp. belizensis, peninsularis). There is considerable variation in the trait pit arrangement in specimens from the western Amazon region. Some specimens from the northwestern Amazon region of Colombia, Brazil, and Peru have quadricussate flower pits rather than the more usual tricussate ones. Because of this, the subgroup is recognized as a subspecies (subspp. quadriflora), and all other specimens are recognized as subsp. deversa. (Henderson, A.J. (2011) A revision of Geonoma. Phytotaxa 17: 1-271.)B

Description

  • Plants 2.4(0.5-5.0) m tall; stems 2.4(0.3-7.0) m tall, 1.0(0.5-1.8) cm in diameter, solitary or clustered, canelike or not cane-like; internodes 1.9(0.5-7.5) cm long, yellowish and smooth. Leaves 11(6-18) per stem, undivided or irregularly pinnate, sometimes regularly pinnate and the pinnae with 1 main vein only, not plicate, bases of blades running diagonally into the rachis; sheaths 12.5(5.0-27.5) cm long; petioles 20.6(4.2?82.0) cm long, drying green or yellowish; rachis 42.0(17.2-92.5) cm long, 3.2(1.4-7.0) mm in diameter; veins not raised or slightly raised and triangular in cross-section adaxially; pinnae 5(1-28) per side of rachis; basal pinna 28.5(10.5-60.5) cm long, 6.4(0.5-27.0) cm wide, forming an angle of 42(20-93)° with the rachis; apical pinna 19.9(8.8-35.5) cm long, 12.4(0.6-26.7) cm wide, forming an angle of 28(14-45)° with the rachis. Inflorescences branched 1?3 orders; prophylls and peduncular bracts not ribbed with elongate, unbranched fibers, flattened, deciduous; prophylls 6.8(3.0-13.0) cm long, not short and asymmetrically apiculate, the surfaces not ridged, without unequally wide ridges; peduncular bracts 4.8(3.2-7.5) cm long, well-developed, inserted 0.3(0.1-0.7) cm above the prophyll; peduncles 8.3(2.0-19.7) cm long, 4.2(1.9-9.0) mm in diameter; rachillae 13(3-43), 16.7(6.5-32.0) cm long, 1.9(1.0-3.4) mm in diameter, the surfaces without spiky, fibrous projections or ridges, drying brown, with faint to pronounced, short, transverse ridges, not filiform and not narrowed between the flower pits; flower pits tricussately or quadricussately arranged throughout the rachillae, the groups of pits closely spaced, glabrous internally; proximal lips without a central notch before anthesis, not recurved after anthesis, hood-shaped at anthesis, sometimes splitting post-anthesis; proximal and distal lips drying the same color as the rachillae, joined to form a raised cupule, the margins not overlapping; distal lips well-developed; staminate and pistillate petals not emergent, not valvate throughout; staminate flowers deciduous after anthesis; stamens 6; thecae diverging at anthesis, inserted almost directly onto the filament apices, the connectives bifid but scarcely developed; anthers short and curled over at anthesis; nonfertilized pistillate flowers deciduous after anthesis; staminodial tubes crenulate or shallowly lobed at the apex, those of non-fertilized flowers not projecting and persistent after anthesis; fruits 6.6(4.5-8.1) mm long, 5.6(4.4-7.0) mm in diameter, the bases without a prominent stipe, the apices not conical, the surfaces not splitting at maturity, without fibers emerging, not bumpy and not apiculate; locular epidermis without operculum, smooth, without pores. (Henderson, A.J. (2011) A revision of Geonoma. Phytotaxa 17: 1-271.)B

Use Record

  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Al igual que otras variedades de Geonoma sus hojas son tejidas en "crisnejas", especialmente en la parte sur de la Amazonía peruana. (Mendoza, D.E. and A. Panduro, El tejido de las hojas de palmera en la vivienda amazónica. 2005)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: By far the most valued species by Yuracarés and Trinitarios for roof thatching is the caespitose short jatata palm (Geonoma deversa). (Thomas, E., Quantitative Ethnobotanical Research on Knowledge and Use of Plants for Livelihood among Quechua, Yuracaré and Trinitario Communities in the Andes and Amazon Regions of Bolivia.. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousYuracaré/TrinitarioBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Cajtafa´or jatata leaves are also used but to a lesser extent because they do not grow in the area of the Reserve. (...). Some Chimane from the Reserve were involved in the jatata trade as employees for the traders. (Chicchon, A., Chimane resource use and market involvement in The Beni Biosphere Reserve, Bolivia. 1992)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimaneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Comercial. Hoja. La hoja es empleada en la fabricación de paños que son comercializados. Construcción. Hoja. Techado de viviendas. (Armesilla, P.J., Usos de las palmeras (Arecaceae),en la Reserva de la Biosfera-Tierra Comunitaria de Orígen Pilón Lajas, (Bolivia). 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Construcción de casas. (Albán, J., La mujer y las plantas útiles silvestres en la comunidad Cocama-Cocamilla de los ríos Samiria y Marañon.. 1994)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionHousesNot specifiedIndigenousCocamaPeru
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Construcción. Hoja. Techado de viviendas Comercial. Hoja. Los "paños" son comercializados (Macía, M.J., Multiplicity in palm uses by the Huaorani of Amazonian Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Construcción. Las hojas de Jatata ina sirven para hacer los paños, para techar las coasas, tejidos en las varillas de Bue (…) de tres a cuatro metros. Estas hojas son muy apreciadas para este uso, porque duran mucho tiempo, dan un aspecto muy limpio y bonito a la casa. Son unas de las mejores hojas para este uso. Como las hojas (…) son muy empleadas se podría intensificar su producción para aumentar los recursos económicos de las familias del lugar. (Bourdy, G., Conozcan nuestros árboles, nuestras hierbas. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTacanaBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: El tallo es utilizado por los jóvenes como instrumento, en momentos de distracción, para ejercitar los músculos de los brazos, doblando pedazos de tallo de 70 a 80 cm de largo. (Cárdenas, D., and Politis, G.G., Territorio, movilidad, etnobotánica y manejo del bosque de los Nukak Orientales. 2000)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    CulturalRecreationalStemIndigenousNukakColombia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: En el departamento de Pando y en general en Bolivia, la "jatata" es la palma más utilizada o apreciada para la construcción de techos, los cuales son muy durables (10 a 15 años) y son tejidos de una forma muy decorativa, generalmente en secciones de aproximadamente 3 x 0.5 m llamados paños. Cada paño consta de dos varillas juntas, generalmente de "majo" y de las hojas de "jatata" tejidas entre éstas. Estos paños son ampliamente comercializados en toda Bolivia. (Gutiérrez-Vásquez, C.A. and R. Peralta, Palmas comunes de Pando, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Estas varían en tamaño, con techos muy elevados, construidas con paños de hojas de jatata (Geonoma deversa), hojas de motacú (Attalea phalerata), los soportes del techo son de chonta (Astrocaryum sp.), (...). (Ticona, J. P., Los chimane: conocimiento y uso de plantas medicinales en la comunidad Tacuaral del Matos ( Provincia Ballivián, Departamento del Beni). 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimaneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Fresh leaves are used for tapping baskets with fruits or other goods. (Borchsenius F., Borgtoft-Pedersen H. and Baslev H. 1998. Manual to the Palms of Ecuador. AAU Reports 37. Department of Systematic Botany, University of Aarhus, Denmark in collaboration with Pontificia Universidad Catalica del Ecuador)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticEntire leafNot identifiedN/AEcuador
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth Español: Palmiche, Ponilla Usos: Construcción — Las hojas son utilizadas en la construcción de los techos para las viviendas. Herramientas y utensilios — En pocos casos se utiliza la raíz como escoba. Comunidad: 4, 7, 9, 12–16, 18–21, 23–26. Voucher: H. Balslev 7513. (Balslev, H., C. Grandez, et al., Useful palms (Arecaceae) near Iquitos, Peruvian Amazon. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticRootNot identifiedN/APeru
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth Vernacular names: Omawe, Teñipawe (adult). Vouchers: Macía et al. #707; Yanez, Macía et al. #2340. Uses. CO: Leaves are used for thatch in traditional houses. D: Thin strips from the stem are used to make combs. HF: The stem is used to make improvised hunting spears. M: The fruits are chewed against bad coughs. (Macía, M.J., Multiplicity in palm uses by the Huaorani of Amazonian Ecuador. 2004)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Medicinal and VeterinaryRespiratory systemFruitsIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
    Utensils and ToolsHunting and fishingStemIndigenousHuaoraniEcuador
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Hojas. Construcción. (Cerón, C.E., Etnobiología de los Cofanes de Dureno, provincia de Sucumbíos, Ecuador. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousShuarEcuador
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Hojas. Sustos de bebés. Quemar con asta de ganado. Inhalaciones. (Aguirre, G., Plantas medicinales utilizadas por los indígenas Mosetén-Tsimane´ de la comunidad Asunción del Quiquibey, en la RB-TCO Pilón Lajas, Beni, Bolivia. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Medicinal and VeterinaryCultural diseases and disordersEntire leafIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: In this city and in the rural villages that surround it, Geonoma panels for roofs are the cheapest alternative to corrugated iron. Most of the urban and rural poor therefore use Geonoma panels in their house construction. (Flores, C.F., and P.M.S. Ashton, Harvesting impact and economic value of Geonoma deversa, Arecaceae, an understory palm used for roof thatching in the Peruvian amazon. 2000)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafMestizoN/APeru
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Las hojas son intensivamente usadas como material para techado por su larga durabilidad (...). (Moraes, M., Contribución al estudio del ciclo biológico de la palma Copernicia alba en un área ganadera (Espíritu, Beni, Bolivia). 1991)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Las hojas son utilizadas para techar las viviendas, y pueden durar desde 1 año hasta 4 años, si son ahumadas antes de ser usadas. Toda la planta se usa para extraer sal, después de quemar, cocinar y filtrar. (Galeano, G., Las palmas de la región de Araracuara. 1992)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/AColombia
    CulturalRecreationalEntire plantNot identifiedN/AColombia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Los recursos no maderables más comunes de mayor utilización por las familias de las comunidades son el asaí, majo y jatata, para el autoconsumo y venta en forma de materia prima y muchas veces en productos derivados como el aceite de majo, paños de jatata, etc., a mercados formales e informales urbanos y rurales, con aplicaciones en el campo alimenticio, medicinal, construcción. En todas las comunidades existe producción de majo, sin embargo, no todas cuentan con la cantidad necesaria para su comercialización. (…). Oenocarpus bataua. Majo. Frutos. Local - Regional-Nacional. (…). Las plantas de majo, asai, palma real y jatata, son todas especies palmáceas que presentan dos tipos de destino, cuando son cosechadas: consumo domestico y comercial. (…). (…), esto se debe principalmente a que existen antecedentes tradicionales de transformación artesanal e industrial de parte de las familias de las comunidades y del mercado para algunos productos derivados como la pulpa de majo y asai, aceites de majo y palma real, además de los paños de jatata para la construcción de techos por sus condiciones naturales de recolección, procesamiento y comercializacion del productor y consumidor. (Feisal, E., PFNM en seis comunidades campesinas del norte amazónico boliviano: Causas de éxito o fracaso de comercialización.. 2009)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Se hacen paños de Jatata para techar viviendas. (Otterburg, M., and M. Mamani, Buenas prácticas de aprovechamiento de Jatata. 2008)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimaneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Se la ocupa para tejer paños de jatata que se utilizan para cubrir los techos de las casas. La jatata es muy buena porque es bien limpia, resiste más al fuego que las otras hojas de palmera y dura mucho tiempo, de quince hasta veinte años. (Langevin, M., Mapajo. Nuestra selva y cultura.. 2002)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimane/MoseteneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Sus hojas se usan para techos de casas de estilo rústico, en el campo para viviendas y en las ciudades en clubes y balnearios. (Moreno Suárez, L., and O.I. Moreno Suárez, Colecciones de las palmeras de Bolivia. 2006)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Sus hojas tejidas en paños se utilizan para el techado de las casas. (…). Existe mercado para la compra de paños en Santa Cruz, Trinidad e iniciándose en Cochabamba. Asimismo, las plantas ofrecidas como ornamentales pueden ser atractivas y aceptadas en la ciudad de Santa Cruz. (Hinojosa, I., E. Uzquiano, E., and J. Flores, Los Yuracaré: su conocimiento, experiencia y la utilización de recursos vegetales en el río Chapare. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousYuracaréBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Thatch. (Shepard, G.H., D.W. Yu, M. Lizarralde, et al., Rain forest habitat classification among the Matsigenka of the Peruvian Amazon. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousMatsigenkaPeru
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Thatching. Arts and crafts. (Moraes, M., J. Sarmiento,and E. Oviedo, Richness and uses in a diverse palm site in Bolivia. 1995)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
    Utensils and ToolsOtherNot specifiedNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: The constructors of houses choose the species based on the planned lifetime of the building, available labor time and the durability of the construction material. For making the roof, the leaves of palms such as jatata (Geonoma deversa) palla (Attalea butyracea), patujú, hoja redonda (Chelyocarpus chuco), asai and motacú are used. (Henkemans, A., Tranquilidad and Hardship in the Forest: Livelihoods and Perceptions of Camba Forest dwellers in the northern Bolivian Amazon. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafMestizoN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: The leaves of the neotropical and and cespitose palm Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth (jatata”) - for their durable quality and burn tolerance - are harvested for thatching. (Moraes, M., and J. Sarmiento, La jatata (Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth, Palmae)- un ejemplo de producto forestal forestal no maderable en Bolivia: uso tradicional en el este del departamento de La Paz.. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: The principal commercial activity for most Ese Eja is Brazil nut and leaf thatch, Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth. (Alexiades, M.N., Ethnobotany of the Ese Ejja: plants, health, and change in an amazonian society. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousEse EjjaPeru
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousEse EjjaBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Trece especies son utilizadas en la construcción de viviendas locales, once de las cuales proporcionan hojas que los pobladores locales utilizan para la fabricación de techos, entre las que destacan Geonoma deversa (Fig. 3) y Attalea phalerata. (…). El 45% (diez especies) del total fue registrado con un solo uso, entre éstas se destaca Geonoma deversa (jatata) destinada únicamente para la fabricación de techos de excelente calidad y una duración que supera los 30 años. (Paniagua Zambrana, N.Y., Guía de plantas útiles de la comunidad de San José de Uchupiamonas. 2001)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/ABolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Trunks ocasionally used to support mosquito nets. (Bodley, J.H., and F.C. Benson, Cultural ecology of Amazonian palms. 1979)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    Utensils and ToolsDomesticStemIndigenousShipibo-ConiboPeru
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Tsimane’, an indigenous people, once lived under a peonage system for manufacturing cajtafa palm leaves and were excluded from urban areas. At the present time the Tsimane’ interact frequently with local authorities, loggers, colonists, and traders in urban areas. (…). The cajtafa palm is harvested for domestic uses and cash income. Apparently, this harvesting does not have a severe negative impact on this species, since the palms are managed and quickly regenerate. (…). The Tsimane’ make extensive use of three palms, jajru, tyutyura and cajtafa, which they protect but do not cultivate. (…). The roofs of houses are made from cajtafa palm, which grows in these areas and is in demand because it is clean, lasts long, and is easy to use for repairing roofs. Tsimane’ people are experts in attaching cajtafa palm leaves. (Huanca, T., Tsimane Indigenous Knowledge, Swidden Fallow Management and Conservation.. 1999)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafIndigenousTsimaneBolivia
    EnvironmentalAgroforestryEntire plantIndigenousTsimaneBolivia
  • Geonoma deversa (Poit.) Kunth: Utilizada para techar. Para la fabricación de cada unidad llamada "paño de crisneja" se utilizan las hojas, las que son tejidas por la parte de los peciolos, utilizando como soporte horizontal una varilla recta de 3 m de largo, la cual se obtiene del raquis foliar de algunas palmeras arbóreas como Oenocarpus bataua, Attalea maripa o tallos de la Gramínea Gynerium sagittatum (…). Un paño tejido convencional mide 3m de largo y 0,60 cm de ancho (longitud de la lámina foliar) y para su fabricación se requieren alrededor de 430-450 hojas. (Chávez, F., Estudio preliminar de la familia Arecaceae (Palmae) en el Parque Nacional del Manu (Pakitza y Cocha Cashu). 1996)
    Use CategoryUse Sub CategoryPlant PartHuman GroupEthnic GroupCountry
    ConstructionThatchEntire leafNot identifiedN/APeru

Bibliography

A. World Checklist of Arecaceae
B. Henderson, A.J. (2011) A revision of Geonoma. Phytotaxa 17: 1-271.